Centrasense® Dryer Booster Kit

  • Centrasense® Dryer Booster Kit
  • Centrasense® Dryer Booster Kit
  • Centrasense® Dryer Booster Kit
  • Centrasense® Dryer Booster Kit
  • Centrasense® Dryer Booster Kit

DRM04

Centrasense® Dryer Booster Kit

205

97

ETL Listed

5 years

4"

Y


INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE ELECTRIC CLOTHES DRYER BOOSTER KIT
READ AND SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS

PLEASE READ AND UNDERSTAND THESE INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE YOU BEGIN THE INSTALLATION OF YOUR DRM04 DRYER EXHAUST DUCT POWERED VENTILATOR (DEDPV).

DRM04 Kit Contains:
• (x1) TFM04 4” corded metal centrifugal fan with monitor
• (x1) TFR100 remote operation indicator
• (x1) English and French TFR100 warning card
• (x35’) of 22 gauge 5-conductor wire
• (x1) CS100 clip-on clothes dryer current sensor with 6’ cord
• (x2) 4” metal cleanout sleeves with band clamps
• (x4) self-adhesive foam strips (to limit vibration transferred to ductwork)

Screwpack Contents:
(x4) 1/4” x 1 1/2” lag bolts (mounting the fan)
(x4) 1/4” washers (mounting the fan)
(x4) 3/8” rubber grommets (lag bolt vibration isolation)
(x2) 6-32 x 1 1/2” machine screws (for mounting remote indicator to electrical box)
(x2) #6 x 1 1/2” sheetmetal screws (for mounting remote indicator flush to drywall)
(x2) #6 7/8” long wall anchors (for mounting remote indicator flush to drywall)
(x3) self-adhesive cord clips (for securing low-voltage signal wiring)

Tools / supplies you will need:
3/16” drill bit (wall anchors if remote is flush-mount, pilot holes for lag bolts).
7/16” socket and ratchet (to tighten lag bolts).
Phillips screwdriver (for mounting remote indicator).
Flathead screwdriver or 5/16” nut driver (for cleanout band clamps).
Sheetmetal shears.
Foil duct tape.
Wire cutters (to cut slot in operation indicator if flush-mounted).
Wire strippers (to cut low-voltage wire to length and strip if needed).

Use this unit only in the manner intended by the manufacturer. If you have any questions, contact the manufacturer. You may phone the manufacturer during normal business hours at 1-800-999-3267 or submit your questions from our website: www.suncourt.com.

The DRM04 Dryer Booster Fan Kit is a Dryer Exhaust Duct Power Ventilator (DEDPV) designed for compliance to UL Standard 705. Any UL705 DEDPV is only suitable for residential electric clothes dryers employing 4” ductwork. Suncourt accepts no responsibility for use of this product in other applications.

 

SECTION I: GENERAL SAFETY WARNINGS

WARNING - FOR INTERIOR USE ONLY.
WARNING - DO NOT USE TO EXHAUST HAZARDOUS OR EXPLOSIVE MATERIALS AND VAPOR OR DUST.
WARNING - DO NOT EXHAUST AIR IN EXCESS OF 158F (70C).
WARNING - NEVER EXPOSE YOUR FAN TO AMBIENT TEMPERATURES OVER 140F (60C).
WARNING - THE VENTILATOR MUST NOT BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH HIGH OUTPUT DRYERS.
WARNING – THE VENTILATOR MUST NOT BE USED WITH GAS DRYERS.
WARNING – THE VENTILATOR MUST NOT BE USED WITH STACKED WASHER / DRYERS USING A SINGLE (SHARED) POWER SUPPLY.
WARNING – ALL DRYER VENT DUCTWORK, FITTINGS, AND VENT CAPS MUST BE 4” DIAMETER. DO NOT INSULATE DUCTWORK BETWEEN THE BOOSTER FAN AND EXHAUST CAP.
WARNING - DO NOT INSTALL VENTILATOR LESS THAN 10 LINEAR FEET FROM THE CLOTHES DRYER EXHAUST OUTLET, MORE THAN 65 EQUIVALENT FEET* FROM THE CLOTHES DRYER, OR MORE THAN 35 EQUIVALENT FEET* FROM EXTERIOR VENT.
WARNING - DO NOT INSTALL IN AN EXHAUST DUCTWORK OF A CLOTHES DRYER WHOSE INSTRUCTIONS PROHIBIT THE INSTALLATION OF A CLOTHES DRYER BOOSTER FAN.
WARNING - DO NOT INSTALL IN AN EXHAUST DUCTWORK WHERE THE EQUIVALENT DUCT LENGTH IS < 25 FEET*. THE DRM04 IS SUITABLE TO OVERCOME AN EQUIVALENT DUCT LENGTH OF 100 FEET* OF 4 INCH DIAMETER RIGID METAL DUCT, AND TO MAINTAIN AN AIR VELOCITY OF 1200FPM.
WARNING - A SECONDARY LINT TRAP MUST BE INSTALLED BETWEEN THE CLOTHES DRYER AND THE DRM04 IF THE DRM04 IS LOCATED LESS THAN 15 LINEAR FEET FROM THE EXHAUST OF THE CLOTHES DRYER.
WARNING – NEVER RELY ON THE DUCT VENTILATOR AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR A DE-ENGERGIZED OR OTHERWISE DEFECTIVE CLOTHES DRYER BLOWER.
THIS DEDPV IS DESIGNED TO WORK IN TANDEM WITH THE CLOTHES DRYER’S INTEGRAL BLOWER.
WARNING - NEVER USE A RHEOSTAT, LIGHT DIMMER SWITCH, SOLID STATE SPEED CONTROL, VARIAC OR ANY OTHER DEVICE TO ALTER THE SPEED OF THE VENTILATOR.
WARNING - INSTALLATION MUST COMPLY WITH LOCAL ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL, FUEL GAS, OR BUILDING CODES, AND MUST BE INSPECTED AND ACCEPTED BY AUTHORITIES HAVING JURISDICTION.

 

ELECTRICAL SAFETY WARNINGS

WARNING – RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK. CAN CAUSE INJURY OR DEATH: DISCONNECT AND/OR LOCKOUT ALL REMOTE ELECTRIC POWER SUPPLIES BEFORE SERVICING OR INSTALLING. WHEN THE SERVICE DISCONNECTING MEANS CANNNOT BE LOCKED, SECURELY FASTEN A PROMINENT WARNING DEVICE, SUCH AS A TAG TO THE SERVICE PANEL.

WARNING – USE COPPER SUPPLY WIRES ONLY.
WARNING – Always unplug or otherwise remove power to your clothes dryer before installing the remote current sensor.
WARNING – The ventilator and integral control box contain no user serviceable parts inside. Alterations to factory wiring or factory circuit adjustment controls will void the warranty.
WARNING – To Reduce the Risk Of Fire, Electrical Shock, or Injury to Persons, Observe the Following:

Your ventilator must be connected to a 110/120 Volt AC, 60Hz fuse or circuit breaker protected power source only in a manner approved by all applicable codes. Never connect your ventilator to a 208 or 240 Volt AC system.

The power source must be protected by a fuse or circuit breaker rated at a minimum of 15 amperes.

The power cord can be plugged in to any standard (NEMA 5-15) 3-prong outlet. The outlet supplying power to the cord must include a ground terminal properly connected to a ground source. The power cord should be secured to a location where it is not subject to damage, abrasion, or temperatures exceeding 140°F (60°C).

 

GENERAL INSTALLATION NOTES

Installation work should be done by a qualified person(s) in accordance with all applicable codes and standards, including fire-rated construction and accessibility.
Always mount the ventilator to an adjacent framing member using the included hardware. Never rely on the ductwork to support the fan.
Always mount the remote operation indicator in a location where it can remain visible to the clothes dryer user.
Always be sure that the function switch on the operation indicator is set to “Sense”.
Use the provided rubber grommets to isolate the fan feet from the mounting bolts to minimize vibration noise. Use the provided foam strips to reduce vibration transferred to the ductwork.
Care should be taken to ensure that the current sensor does not become unplugged from the remote indicator panel. Using the provided self-adhesive cord clips to help keep the current sensor cord securely mounted against the wall will minimize the risk of dislodging the current sensor cord plug.
To prevent air leaks, use a good quality foil duct tape to seal the seams in the ductwork after installing the ventilator and removable cleanout sleeves.
Always leave your ventilator accessible for maintenance, cleaning, or repair.
Always minimize the use of flexible ducting to ensure proper airflow and minimize lint buildup.
When your clothes dryer is installed in an unventilated closet, follow the dryer manufacturer’s recommendations for proper door louver sizing and placement.

 

(*)GENERAL NOTE ABOUT DUCT LENGTH

Maximum and minimum equivalent lengths shown in this literature are for “effective” length of ductwork. Subtract 10’ for each standard 90 degree elbow, subtract 5’ for each long sweep elbow, and subtract double the length of flexible duct to determine the maximum or minimum allowable duct run. Consult manufacturer’s literature for equivalent duct length of exterior vent hood and secondary lint trap (if applicable).

A minimum of 1200 feet per minute air velocity is required to move entrained lint through the duct system. The DRM04 ventilator is certified to 1230FPM for all equivalent duct lengths up to 100 feet long. However, duct runs before and after the DEDPV must be optimized to ensure reliable operation of the DEDPV visual alarm conditions.
(See Section II for information about minimum and maximum duct lengths.)

 

GENERAL WARNING ABOUT DEDPV OPERATION / INSTALLATION

WARNING – TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE, ELECTRIC SHOCK, OR INJURY TO PERSONS, OBSERVE THE FOLLOWING:
(1) Your clothes dryer installation incorporates a dryer exhaust duct power ventilator (DEDPV) which may be in a different location than your clothes dryer, such as in the attic, crawl space, or basement.
(2) Your clothes dryer depends on the DEDPV for its safe and efficient operation. Operating your dryer without a functional DEDPV will result in inefficient dryer operation, excess energy consumption, and a possible fire hazard. See warning on the alarm notification panel (operation indicator).
(3) The notification/annunciator panel shall be permanently installed within the space in which the clothes dryer is installed. In the case of a dryer installed in an alcove provided with a door or doors, the notification/annunciator panel shall be installed within the alcove or be installed immediately adjacent to the doors of the alcove. The notification/annunciator panel shall be located where it will be readily visible after the dryer is installed without having to open any doors other than those necessary to access the clothes dryer.

 

SECTION II: PLANNING YOUR DUCT RUN

 

Notes:
(1) Lint trap is required if (a+b) < 15 feet actual distance. Lint trap will also reduce the frequency of required periodic cleaning of the DEDPV.
(2) For total effective length (TEL), add 10 feet for each short sweep elbow, add 5 feet for each long sweep elbow, and double the length of flexible duct used.

Minimizing the total effective length (TEL) of (a+b) will ensure reliable shutdown of the DEDPV in the event of an overheating duct condition.
Minimizing the total effective length (TEL) of c will ensure accurate low airflow alarm indication in the event of a vent blockage.

 

SECTION III: MOUNTING THE VENTILATOR

After determining the ideal position within the duct run per Section II, a suitable mounting location for the ventilator must be chosen. The ventilator can mount in any orientation. Chose a location where the ventilator can be securely mounted to a framing member. Never rely on the ductwork to support the fan. Add framing if necessary to ensure that all four mounting holes are bolted down.
Be sure to locate the fan such that there will not be an elbow or duct hanger within 16" of either side of the fan. This will allow full clearance for both cleanout sleeves to slide out for cleaning.
Step 1: Prepare the ductwork for installation.
• For an existing installation, cut out a 20" section of ductwork and mount the ventilator in the center.
• For a new installation, mount the ventilator and install the inlet and exhaust duct leaving a 6" gap between the end of the duct and the inlet/exhaust ports of the ventilator.
Step 2: Hold the ventilator in position being sure to note the airflow direction arrow and trace the bracket holes onto the framing.
Step 3: Use a 3/16" drill bit to drill pilot holes for the mounting bolts.
Step 4: Press each of the four provided rubber grommets onto the underside of the ventilator bracket holes, place the ventilator, and align each rubber grommet with the pilot holes.
Step 5: Place each of the provided washers onto the provided lag bolts and press into rubber grommet and pilot hole. Use a 7/16" wrench or socket to secure all four lag bolts. As the bolts are tightened, the washer will squeeze the rubber grommet onto the bracket providing isolation from the framing.

Provide or locate a power source for the ventilator. The DEDPV requires a constant (un-switched) power source and comes with a 6' 3-prong power cord attached to the ventilator. Locate or provide a suitable nearby outlet. Ideally, this would be an isolated power source with its own breaker. At a minimum, the DEDPV should not share its power source with other motorized equipment such as the washing machine.

WARNING - DO NOT APPLY POWER TO THE DEDPV UNTIL ALL INSTALLATION STEPS ARE COMPLETED.

GENERAL NOTE ABOUT VENTILATOR MOUNTING POSITION

The ventilator can mount in any orientation, both horizontal or vertical. In a horizontal installation, it is important to keep the ductwork pitched away from the fan in both directions. In the event of moisture intrusion either from the exterior vent or internal condensation, this will ensure that the excess moisture will not build up inside the ventilator body.

SECTION IV: MOUNTING THE CLEANOUT SLEEVES

Removable cleanout sleeves are provided for periodic inspection and/or cleaning of the DEDPV. The sleeves are secured with band clamps and slide out of the way to inspect the inside of the DEDPV.

The sleeves ship nested together. Remove each sleeve from the package and place one provided self-adhesive foam strip to only one end of each sleeve. The strip should be adhered to the underside of the sleeve flush with the rounded edge. Place the other two self-adhesive foam strips on the outside surface of the inlet/outlet neck of the ventilator. When the sleeves are installed, the foam on the sleeves should be pressed into the foam on the ventilator neck. This will provide additional vibration isolation.

With the 'foamed' end facing the ventilator, open each cleanout sleeve and press onto the pipe end. Leave 3-4" of clearance between the open end of the sleeve and the ventilator. Ensure that the sleeve is overlapping itself, hold it in position, and slide two provided band clamps over each sleeve. Slide each sleeve into position such that the sleeve end is fully mated with the ventilator neck. Each sleeve should overlap the dryer ductwork by 3-4". Move one band clamp in between the ventilator and the first bead on the sleeve. Move the second band clamp toward the ductwork end. This clamp should be positioned behind the bead on the ductwork end of the sleeve. Using a ratchet or drill/driver with 5/16" bit, tighten each band clamp. Do not fully tighten one clamp before tightening the next. Instead, alternate between both clamps as you tighten. When fully tightened, the seam in the cleanout sleeve should appear nearly straight and the sleeve should overlap itself by approximately 1 1/2". Use a good quality foil duct tape to seal the connections and the seam. As with the remainder of the dryer duct system, no screws are permissible. Repeat this process for the other cleanout sleeve.

WARNING - DO NOT APPLY POWER TO THE DEDPV UNTIL ALL INSTALLATION STEPS ARE COMPLETED.

SECTION V: MOUNTING THE OPERATION INDICATOR

Choose a location for the operation indicator where it will be visible to the clothes dryer end-user. Also choose a location where the 6 foot cord from the current sensor (see Section VI) will reach the operation indicator. If this does not suit your ideal location, any standard 1/8" (3.5mm) "headphone" extension cable can be used to extend the distance between the indicator and the current sensor.

The DRM04 ships with the control wiring connected to both the ventilator and the remote indicator. When disconnecting the control wiring from the indicator to route the cable, make note that the underside of the indicator includes a sticker showing the terminal block connections "A" thru "E" and the corresponding colors of each control wire lead. Care should be taken to ensure that the control wiring does not run along side any power lines, telephone, Ethernet, or coax cabling. If additional control wiring length is needed, the provided cabling should be spliced with either the same 5-conductor type CM wire included with the unit, or standard CL2 (thermostat) wire. Alternate color codes for thermostat wire are also shown on the wiring sticker. The remote indicator wire can be a maximum length of 75 feet.

The operation indicator front panel card has English printed on one side and French on the other. Spanish warning cards are available by contacting the manufacturer. The operation indicator for the DRM04 dryer exhaust duct power ventilator has two LED's visible from the front.

The operation indicator can be installed on a standard single-gang electrical box with the control wiring concealed in the wall. It can also be flush-mounted to the wall with the control wiring exposed or concealed. Both installation methods are addressed below.

MOUNTING THE REMOTE INDICATOR TO AN ELECTRICAL BOX

Step 1: Cut an appropriate hole in the drywall for the electrical box and route the control wiring to the electrical box. Either a standard enclosed box or low-voltage open frame can be used. In both cases, choose a "new work" box for ease of installation.
Step 2: Be sure that the 2-position switch on the back of the indicator is set to "sense".
Step 3: Reconnect control wiring to the indicator following the colors shown on the wiring sticker.
Step 4: Locate the provided indicator warning card and align it to the front of the indicator. Be sure that the clear hexagonal holes in the card are placed over the hexagonal holes in the indicator housing.
Step 5: Use the provided 6-32 x 1 1/2" machine screws to hold the card in place and mount the indicator to the electrical box or low-voltage frame with a Phillips screwdriver.

MOUNTING THE REMOTE INDICATOR FLUSH ON THE WALL

Step 1: Use the provided indicator warning card as a stencil to mark the locations of the drywall anchors.
Step 2: Drill holes for the wall anchors using a 3/16" drill bit.
Step 3: Install the two provided wall anchors.
Step 4: Be sure that the 2-position switch on the back of the indicator is set to "sense".
Step 5: Reconnect control wiring to the indicator following the colors shown on the wiring sticker.
Step 6: Locate the square wiring knock-out on the top of the housing and remove it using either wire cutters or a utility knife.
Step 7: Locate the provided indicator warnings card and align it to the front of the indicator. Be sure that the clear hexagonal holes in the card are placed over the hexagonal holes in the indicator housing.
Step 8: Use the provided #6 x 1 1/2" sheetmetal screws to hold the card in place and mount the indicator to the wall anchors with a Phillips screwdriver. Remember to route the control wiring through the knockout so the indicator will sit flush on the wall.
Step 9: Use two provided cord clips to hold the control wiring flush to the drywall.

WARNING - DISCONNECT POWER TO DRYER BEFORE OPENING THE WIRING COMPARTMENT.  

SECTION VI: MOUNTING THE DRYER CURRENT SENSOR                                                                        

Disconnect power source and exhaust duct from the clothes dryer and locate the power wiring compartment next to the power cord entry. Open the wiring compartment and make note of the number of conductors on your power cord. If you have only three conductors, the middle conductor is a shared ground/neutral, the two remaining conductors are "hot", and the cord is typically grey in color. If you have four conductors, the green conductor is ground, the white conductor is neutral, the two remaining black and red conductors are "hot", and the cord is typically black in color.

The current sensor must be clipped on to a "hot" conductor to properly interlock the ventilator to the clothes dryer. Choosing the correct "hot" conductor can sometimes involve some trial-and-error. The clothes dryer's motor is only connected to one hot conductor and this is the conductor that needs to be monitored.

        

CONNECTIONS AND MOUNTING 

Step 1: Start by selecting one "hot" conductor and clip the provided blue current sensor onto that conductor. Only that single conductor should be inside the current sensor's body once clipped on.
Step 2: Tuck the current sensor back into the compartment and replace the wiring compartment cover being careful not to crush the current sensor wire exiting the compartment.
Step 3: Temporarily plug the current sensor wire into the jack on the remote indicator panel.
Step 4: Temporarily re-connect power to the dryer.
Step 5: Temporarily connect power to the DEDPV ventilator. If the red "fail" light is lit solid on the indicator, make sure the plug from the current sensor wire is fully seated into the jack.

TESTING INTERLOCK

Step 6: With the clothes dryer's exhaust duct still disconnected, set the dryer to an "air fluff" (no heat) cycle and start the dryer.
Step 7: Observe that the green "sense" light on the remote indicator is lit solid after 2-3 seconds of clothes dryer operation. This indicates that the interlock is successful and the ventilator is operating.
Step 8: Observe that the ventilator is drawing air through the exhaust duct.
Step 9: Stop the clothes dryer and observe that the green "sense" light turns off after 10-15 seconds. This indicates that the ventilator is no longer operating.

** If the behavior of the remote indicator and ventilator described during steps 7 thru 9 does not match your observations, your interlock was not successful. Remove power to the clothes dryer and ventilator. Disconnect the current sensor plug from the remote indicator jack. Open the clothes dryer's wiring compartment. Select the other "hot" conductor and repeat steps 1 thru 9 **

FINAL STEPS

Step 10: Reconnect exhaust duct to clothes dryer and move the clothes dryer back into position.
Step 11: Mount a provided self-adhesive cord clip on the current sensor wire close to the plug. This will help prevent the current sensor plug from becoming dislodged.

SECTION VII: CARE AND MAINTENANCE                                                                                                       

WARNING - DISCONNECT POWER TO THE DEDPV BEFORE INSPECTING THE UNIT.

The DRM04 is designed to provide years of trouble-free operation. However, periodic maintenance of the DRM04 and the duct system is required to ensure optimum performance and safety of your overall dryer exhaust system.
The DRM04 motor includes permanently lubricated bearings. No periodic maintenance of the motor itself is required.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Even with a properly installed DEDPV, lint accumulation within the duct system and connected accessories is unavoidable. But the degree to which the lint accumulates over time can be reduced by following some general recommendations. To reduce the lint accumulation in your duct system and DEDPV, observe the following:

• Never operate your clothes dryer without a lint trap installed.
• Always clean your clothes dryer's lint trap after each cycle.
• Ensure that your clothes dryer's lint trap does not have any holes in the mesh or cracks in the frame and is fully secured in place.
• Check your secondary lint trap (if any) after each cycle.
• Even if a secondary lint trap is not required per note 1 of Section II, its installation will reduce the lint accumulation downstream of the trap and will reduce the frequency of periodic duct system and/or DEDPV inspections.
• If your clothes dryer is located in a closet, follow the clothes dryer manufacturer's recommendations regarding the placement and size of door louvers for adequate make-up air.
• Minimize the use of flexible ductwork.
• Make sure the flexible ductwork behind the clothes dryer is not blocked or crushed and minimize the number of bends, dips/valleys, or changes in direction. Remove length from this flexible duct if necessary to ensure this recommendation is followed.
• Never mount a bird guard on a clothes dryer exhaust vent hood.
• Avoid soffit-mounted vents for dryer duct applications if possible. Their mesh bird-guards are typically not removable and their location often requires a 90 degree elbow immediately preceding the vent. An elbow in this location will cause unnecessary back-pressure and will significantly reduce the performance of the exhaust duct system.
• Do not mount your exterior vent hood in a location where it can be blocked by snow, foliage, or other obstructions.
• Remember to periodically check your exterior exhaust vent hood for blockages.

CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE

This section refers specifically to the cleaning and maintenance of the DRM04 DEDPV clothes dryer booster fan. Refer to your clothes dryer's literature or related trade publications regarding the cleaning and maintenance of the dryer duct, exterior vent hood, and the clothes dryer itself.
We recommend inspecting the interior of the DRM04 for lint accumulation every 3 months after initial installation. If after several inspections you find this to be too frequent (little accumulation inside the ventilator), you can extend the time between inspections as necessary. The rate of required inspection depends on dryer usage and the overall duct system design and orientation. At a minimum, we recommend inspecting the DRM04 for lint accumulation every 6 months.
Record the date of your last inspection. If you are inspecting the DEDPV due to an error indication[1] as noted in Section IX, make note of your last inspection date and adjust your inspection/cleaning frequency as required.

Follow these steps to inspect and clean your DRM04 DEDPV:
1. Remove power to the DEDPV.
2. Slice the foil tape on each end of each cleanout sleeve and across each seam of the sleeve.
3. Loosen all 4 band clamps using a Flat head screwdriver or ratchet/drill driver with 5/16" bit. Loosen each clamp until the cleanout's seam has moved by about 3/4" (use the two cut pieces of foil tape along the seam as a reference). This should provide adequate clearance to slide the sleeves out of the way for inspection. The position of each band clamp needn't be moved.
4. Slide both cleanout sleeves away from the ventilator. Be careful not to force each sleeve too far back toward the duct to avoid disturbing the foam gasket on the underside of the sleeve.
5. Inspect the interior of the ventilator. Most accumulation will be noted on the inlet side, but it is important to inspect both sides.
6. Remove any accumulated lint[1].
a. Do not use any sharp tools or objects to remove lint. This could damage the impeller, motor wiring, or high-limit fuse inside the ventilator body.
b. Be careful not to disturb the balancing clips on the impeller.
c. Do not apply any chemicals to the ventilator's interior or use aerosol sprays. This could weaken the impeller material or damage the motor.
7. Slide each cleanout sleeve back into position such that they are fully mated with the ventilator's inlet/outlet necks and the ventilator foam gasket will mate with the sleeve's foam gasket once tightened.
8. After noting that the band clamps are each in their correct position (see Section IV), re-tighten the band clamps. As noted in Section IV, alternate between both clamps until both are fully tightened to ensure that the seam of each cleanout sleeve is straight.
9. Reseal both ends of each cleanout sleeve with foil tape.
10. Reseal the seam of each cleanout sleeve with foil tape.
11. Restore power to the DEDPV.
Notes[1]: If your lint accumulation is excessive (complete blockage of inlet side of ventilator) and you are assured that your inspection frequency is adequate, then revisit all items in the 'Recommendations' section above. If you have eliminated all other items in the 'Recommendations' section as the root cause of this excessive buildup, you will need to install a secondary lint trap between the clothes dryer and the DEDPV.

SECTION Vlll: LIMITED WARRANTY                                                  

Subject to the following limitation, Suncourt Inc. (manufacturer) warrants that this DEDPV (Dryer Exhaust Duct Power Ventilator) will, for 5 (five) years from the date of original purchase, remain free from appearance of defects in workmanship or materials when installed in accordance with this instruction set, all applicable codes and standards and fire rated construction in the application for its designed and specified use. This Limited Warranty is subject to the following limitations: (a) manufacturer's liability is limited to the replacement or repair of the unit, as decided by the manufacturer; (b) a defective unit must be returned, prepaid, with proof of purchase, to Suncourt Inc, and (c) this Limited Warranty does not apply if:
a. Shipping damage occurs. Claims must be filed with the freight company within 1 (one) week.
b. Damage results from faulty installation or electrical wiring.
c. Inadequate maintenance.
d. Damage results from: Incorrect wiring, voltage, voltage spikes from lightning or other sources.
e. The DEDPV (Dryer Exhaust Duct Power Ventilator) including any packaged accessories is altered or modified in any form whatsoever,
including unauthorized repair.
f. Suncourt ID label is removed.
g. Damage or failure is due to an act of God.
h. This product is used in other than a residential application.
i. The damage or failure is found to have violated one or more of the General Safety Warnings specified in Section I of this document.

This Limited Warranty is given in lieu of all other warranties, guarantees and conditions on manufacturer's part and manufacturer shall have no tortious or other liability with respect to this DEDPV (Dryer Exhaust Duct Power Ventilator).

Suncourt reserves the right to change product specifications without notice.

SECTION lX: ERROR INDICATIONS AND REMEDIATION                                                                                              

WARNING - ANY ERROR INDICATED BY THE OPERATION INDICATOR SHOULD BE ADDRESSED IMMEDIATELY. A VENTILATOR FAILURE, CLOGGED DUCT, BLOCKED VENT, OR OTHERWISE UNDERPERFORMING CLOTHES DRYER EXHAUST DUCT SYSTEM IS A HAZARDOUS CONDITION. DO NOT OPERATE THE CLOTHES DRYER UNTIL THE PROBLEM HAS BEEN RESOLVED.

USE THIS GUIDE TO HELP YOU IDENTIFY THE CAUSE OF THE ERROR.  IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS OR CONCERNS, CALL THE MANUFACTURER AT 800-999-3267 DURING NORMAL BUSINESS HOURS OR SUBMIT A QUESTION USING OUR WEBSITE.  BOTH THE MANUFACTURER'S PHONE NUMBER AND WEBSITE URL ARE PRINTED ON THE OPERATION INDICATOR CARD.  

• A green "sense" LED indicates that the DRM04 detects the operation of the clothes dryer. It should remain lit throughout the clothes dryer cycle and for 10-15 seconds after the dryer stops.
• A red "fail" LED indicates a problem. If the system is working properly, it should never be lit. If an error is detected, the red "fail" LED will either blink or remain solidly lit depending on the type of error. It will continue to indicate the failure after the clothes dryer cycle has ended. Once the problem has been resolved, the "fail" LED should stop its indication after 15-20 seconds of another new clothes dryer cycle (or if the DEDPV loses its power source).

 

 

Unit Box Size Packaged Unit Weight Units per Case Case Size Case Weight
W D H lbs.   W D H lbs.
18.00" 11.50" 15.00" 15.25 " " "
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How would I know if I need a booster fan for my clothes dryer? 

All clothes dryers require adequate exhaust airflow to function properly.  When that airflow is reduced, the clothes dryer performance is negatively affected.  Without adequate airflow, not only will the clothes dryer take longer to perform its task and use more energy, but lint can accumulate inside the duct system and inside the dryer itself over time.  

Sometimes all you need to restore your dryer's performance is a good professional cleaning of your dryer and duct system.  If you have noticed that your clothes dryer doesn't perform as well as it used to, this is an indicator that lint buildup may be at fault.  But it is important to also examine what allowed the lint to excessively accumulate inside the duct in the first place.  Lint accumulation is normal and requires periodic cleaning of both the duct and dryer, but a correctly installed dryer with a properly designed duct system shouldn't allow lint to accumulate excessively.  Excessive lint-buildup and airflow problems can sometimes be resolved by taking a careful look at your dryer duct system. 

Sometimes the problem is the duct design itself.  If you have noticed that your clothes dryer has never performed well, this may be the cause.  Safety standards such as UL and CSA define adequate dryer duct air velocity as 1200 feet per minute (FPM).  This air velocity is considered adequate to move entrained lint through the duct and out of the vent.  Most residential clothes dryers are equipped to provide this air velocity up to a certain amount of "equivalent length" of ductwork, and each is rated for a specific maximum equivalent length.  Each additional foot of ductwork adds to the friction by a defined amount as do each of the elbow fittings.  This friction acts against the airflow and reduces the air velocity.  If your clothes dryer's recommended maximum duct length is unavailable to you, the 2015 International Residential Code defines the safe maximum "total equivalent length" (TEL) as 35 feet.  35 feet of length sounds like plenty, but 35 feet of "equivalent" length can be much less than you expected.  When calculating the TEL of your duct system, add 5' for every standard 90-degree elbow, double the actual length of flexible duct used behind your dryer, and remember to add another 5' if the flexible duct behind the dryer also turns 90 degrees.  Certain types of exterior vents can also be restrictive and contribute to the total effective length.  An example using a dryer duct that turns upward into the attic and exits the side of the house: if you have 2 1/2 feet of flexible duct that turns 90 degrees, then a 10' vertical pipe with another 90 degree elbow on top, you have already used up 20 equivalent feet.  There is only 15' left in your horizontal run to the vent before the allowable 35' TEL is exceeded.  If you do this calculation with the clothes dryer exhaust duct in your home and note that you have exceeded the clothes dryer manufacturer's TEL (or the IRC's recommendation of 35 feet), you have two options.  One option is to relocate your clothes dryer and/or exterior vent such that their locations will require lengths of duct and fittings that fall inside the allowable TEL.  The second option is to add a clothes dryer booster fan to your duct system. 

In new construction, the ideal placement of your clothes dryer and exterior vent are sometimes your primary concern and the resultant TEL of duct required for those locations falls outside of the recommended TEL.  Your only choice is a clothes dryer booster fan.

A clothes dryer booster fan installs inline with your existing or new 4" dryer exhaust duct and will synchronize or interlock its operation with your clothes dryer.   This interlock can be achieved by either a pressure sensor or current sensor.

Why is a current sensor better than a pressure sensor for the dryer interlock?

In order for the booster to operate properly, it must interlock or synchronize its operation with the clothes dryer.  A pressure sensor is one approach to achieve this interlock, but is not the best way in our view.  A pressure sensor integral to the fan imposes restrictions on the mounting orientation of the fan.  Care must be taken to orient the fan such that the intrusion of moisture in the sensing tube is reduced.  Moisture and dust/lint buildup in the pressure sensor body can lead to problems.  The second problem with a pressure sensor interlock is that the booster fan must run on a timed cycle.  The fan must periodically turn off for a time and check the pressure sensor once more for the presence of positive pressure to determine if the clothes dryer is still operating.  Turning the booster off repeatedly in the middle of a dryer cycle potentially increases the risk of lint buildup, and can also be a nuisance if you can hear the fan starting and stopping.  The calibration cycle of some pressure-interlocked booster fans can be a nuisance as well.  Interruptions to the power supply will force the fan to perform its 5 minute calibration cycle every time power is restored.  Since the booster fan's pressure sensing cycle is on a fixed interval, it will often run for several minutes after the clothes dryer cycle has ended.  There is no benefit to this extended run period.  In fact, removing the lint from the clothes dryer's lint trap while the booster fan is continuing to draw air through the screen can be more difficult.

A better approach to interlocking the booster fan's operation with the clothes dryer is to use a current sensor.  The current sensor will detect operation of the clothes dryer's motor and start/stop the booster fan accordingly.  This is a much more reliable synchronization to the clothes dryer's operation that doesn't require cycling or inadvertently extended run-times.  But a standard current sensor switch requires a hard-wired connection to the booster fan and involves interfacing with the supply wiring to the clothes dryer's power outlet on the wall.  This line-voltage wiring work can be a barrier to some installers. This wiring work can be intimidating to the average do-it-yourself installer, or it can add unwelcome time to the busy professional installer's job.  Suncourt's DEDPV uses a low-voltage clip-on (non-invasive) current sensor to achieve this interlock with minimal installation effort and time.  The current sensor clips around one of the cord's power leads on the back of the clothes dryer.  The sensor sits nicely inside the clothes dryer's wiring compartment after it is clipped onto the power lead.  Since clothes dryers include a terminal block inside the wiring compartment for a customer-provided power cord, and our current sensor interfaces only with that power cord, the use of our current sensor does not constitute a modification of "factory wiring."  Our current sensor interfaces to our booster fan's indicator panel using a 72" long cord with a standard 1/8" TRS phone plug, commonly used with headphones or computer speakers.  Additional distance can be added between the sensor and indicator panel with an off-the-shelf extension cable if needed.  Standards require that a booster fan start within one minute of the start of clothes dryer operation.  Our fan starts after 3 seconds of continuous clothes dryer current detection.  Standards also require that a booster fan run no longer than 5 minutes after the dryer cycle has ended.  Our fan stops after 10 seconds. 

    

   

What is a DEDPV?

A DEDPV is a dryer exhaust duct power ventilator.  It is a term used by safety standards and the International Residential Code to describe a specific category of clothes dryer booster fans.  Clothes dryer booster fans solve a particular problem.  But they may introduce new problems to the duct system if they do not function as intended.  In recognizing the implications of these potential problems, UL developed specific standards for clothes dryer booster fans.  These standards include specific construction requirements, performance standards, and additional safety features.  These standards were appended to the UL Standard 705 in a section devoted specifically to DEDPV's.  CSA22.2 113 also adopted similar standards for DEDPV's.  All manufacturers of DEDPV's carrying a mark of safety conformance must meet one or both of these standards if their product is marked as a DEDPV.  These standards ensure that all clothes dryer booster fans produced to the DEDPV standard will perform as intended and will include specific design features that properly mitigate the risks of potential malfunction. 

 

Why is a DEDPV necessary?

 Certified DEDPV's were required for all new residential construction in the 2015 International Residential Code.  While many individual jurisdictions across the US are still on an older IRC standard, adoption of the 2015 IRC is gaining ground and it is expected that the 2015 IRC will be the prevalent standard everywhere clothes dryer duct boosters are used.  Only certified DEDPV's will be acceptable for use.  Clothes dryer booster fans not marked as DEDPV units will not pass building inspections.  DEDPV's are required for clothes dryer boosting applications due to their additional safety features. 

What are the additional safety features of a DEDPV?

A certified DEDPV has certain safety features that are not included in a standard clothes dryer booster fan:

-The housing of the DEDPV must be metal to maintain the fire-rating of the dryer duct assembly.

-The DEDPV must shut down within 15 seconds if it detects a fire inside the clothes dryer or inlet duct. This is a very important safety feature that a standard clothes dryer booster fan does not have. A certified DEDPV will shut down before it can contribute to the spread of fire.

-The DEDPV must include an indication panel that shows that the fan is properly operating, and also shows when the fan is not operating properly. The DEDPV must warn the end-user of a low airflow condition in the duct system. This condition could exist due to crushed flexible duct, inoperable flap(s) in the vent, duct obstructions, or excessive lint buildup anywhere in the dryer or duct system.  This low-airflow condition could also exist if the DEDPV itself is malfunctioning.  That is an important warning since a non-operable fan in your otherwise problematic dryer duct makes the situation worse.  A certified DEDPV must make this low airflow failure notification to the end-user within 4 minutes.  Our DEDPV notifies this condition instantly.  A certified DEDPV will continue to show a "failure" status indefinitely until the problem is resolved.  The standard will allow the omission of an indicator panel if the DEDPV instead prevents the clothes dryer from operating any time one of these duct failure conditions is present.                                   

 

                                    

 

-The DEDPV must include provisions for periodic cleaning. The end-user must be able to easily inspect and clean the interior of the fan without removing the fan or any ductwork. We include removable metal duct cleanout sleeves in our kit for this purpose.  The band clamps on each sleeve are loosened and both sleeves slide out of the way for inspection/cleaning.  Without removable sleeves, a professional duct cleaner won't be able to pass their cleaning device through the entirety of the dryer duct without first removing the DEDPV. 

 

                

 

-The safety listing agency tests the performance of the DEDPV according to the special section in UL standard 705 and/or CSA22.2 113. The testing is rigorous and includes humidity conditioning tests, verifying proper interlock with the clothes dryer, verifying proper airflow at the maximum length, confirming that the fan can handle the duct temperatures at the minimum length, confirming that the fan is capable of maintaining the required airflow at the maximum length when subjected to significant lint-buildup conditions, verifying prompt shutdown during a clothes dryer fire, and proper notification of a low airflow condition. Their testing also authenticates most of the DEDPV manufacturer's claims about performance. As of this writing, only three ventilation manufacturers in the world have satisfied the safety requirements to carry a DEDPV designation on their product.

-All of these features must be integral to the product in order to carry a DEDPV certification. The 2015 IRC requires a fan certified as a DEDPV. Only a fan with these integral features will be certified as a DEDPV after a safety listing agency has tested and verified these features.  A building inspector will look for this DEDPV designation on the fan during an inspection.

Why is Suncourt's DEDPV rated for 100' of duct?

When a DEDPV is certified by a safety listing agency, a "length" of duct is simulated by using a damper to produce the equivalent static pressure of that length.  The listing agency verifies that your fan still produces 1200FPM of air velocity at the maximum equivalent length claimed.  Our fan produces much more than 1200FPM at this equivalent 100' length, and thusly our maximum advertised length could be higher than 100'.  But we have determined the optimum maximum distance.  A safety listing agency does not test a DEDPV's ability to accurately indicate the low-airflow conditions when installed in various positions within varying duct lengths.  We performed these tests ourselves using actual lengths of duct and fittings rather than simulating the length with a damper.  We found on the outlet side that the accuracy of the low-airflow indication is optimum within 35 feet from the vent.  We also determined that the optimum distance to the clothes dryer is up to 65' in order to reliably shut down within 15 seconds of detecting excessive duct temperature.  So these two distances form the basis of our 100' maximum recommended duct length.

 

Subtracting the friction losses from the elbows and exterior vent and assuming 10' of length is used up in vertical elevation, that leaves between 70' and 80' of allowable equivalent duct length from the clothes dryer to the location of the exterior vent.  This is more than ample for the typical residential application.  Having additional equivalent duct length beyond 100' looks like a good metric on paper, but isn't relevant to the application.  A clothes dryer placed anywhere inside even a 10,000 square foot single-story home would find a vent on the nearest exterior wall less than 50 feet away.

What is Centrasense® and what are its advantages in a DEDPV?

For a DEDPV to do its job of notifying the end-user of potential low-airflow conditions, the fan needs a way to measure the airflow.  There are many ways of accomplishing this often involving additional internal or external sensors.  Our patented method uses no sensors, but instead directly monitors the impeller motor's electrical characteristics.  These characteristics change in predictable and measurable ways under different airflow conditions.  This correlation of motor electrical characteristics to airflow forms the basis of our Centrasense® technology. 

Unique advantages available only with our DEDPV employing Centrasense®:

 

  • Instantaneous indication of high inlet static pressure condition (low outlet airflow).
  • Instantaneous indication of low inlet static pressure condition (low inlet airflow).
  • Fan reliably starts after 3 seconds of continuous clothes dryer operation.
  • No periodic on/off cycling during clothes dryer operation.
  • Fan stops 10 seconds after the clothes dryer stops operation.
  • Fan can be installed in any orientation.
  • No calibration cycle required when first powering up the unit.
  • Remote indicator is designed for both surface mounting or electrical box mounting.

Each and every one of our DRM04 DEDPV fans are assembled and carefully calibrated right here at our facility in Durant, IA.  And our method of motor detection, Centrasense®, is protected by a utility patent as is our use of a clip-on non-invasive current sensor for the clothes dryer interlock.