FAQs

Accessories

Airflow Control Dampers

What is a Suncourt Motorized Damper?

Suncourt Motorized Dampers also known as Zone Dampers, Motorized Duct Dampers, or Automatic Dampers are mounted in ductwork to automatically shut off or open branches of the duct to airflow. They are available in normally open (power close) or normally closed (power open) configurations.

What would I use a Motorized Damper for?

 

  • Zone Control-Do you have a spare bedroom that you don’t want to fully heat or air condition because the room is rarely used? A Zone Damper will shut off air to that room’s registers and only allow air to flow again when temperatures in that room exceed or drop below your preset temperature. Zone Dampers are typically controlled by a thermostat or some type of master controller. Likewise Zone Dampers can control airflow to whole sections of a home or building to regulate temperature in those specific areas at certain times of the day, evening or the time of your choosing, which saves on heating and cooling bills.
  • Ventilation-Zone Dampers can open to allow temporary ventilation of homes, garages, greenhouses, or other rooms where fresh air intake or stale air outtake is required.

 

How does a Motorized Damper run?

Suncourt Automatic Dampers are 24-volt powered and require a transformer. Suncourt® ZoneMaster™ Dampers are often installed by homeowners and have a transformer included in the box. Suncourt Pro Dampers are often installed by professionals and do not have a transformer included in the box. Automatic Dampers can be wired to 24-volt thermostats. Suncourt Automatic Dampers feature a soft-stop, freewheeling coupling between the motor and the damper shaft, which greatly improves life over other similar style dampers on the market. Suncourt Automatic Dampers feature a hysteresis motor that is designed to hold the damper closed or open with power indefinitely.

What is Zone Control?

Zone Control refers to regulating the temperature in one single room in your home by means of shutting air supply to that room via the ductwork ON or OFF using a wall thermostat in that room combined with motorized damper in the duct supplying air to that room.

Why do I want to control the temperature in a single room?

To save significantly on home heating and cooling cost.

Give me an example of how I would save money:

O.K. Let us say you have a room in your home that is used only occasionally, like a guest room.
Why heat that room to 70°F all winter long, or cool it to 76°F all summer. Keep it at 55°F in the winter and 85°F in the summer. Same story for a bedroom. Like to sleep in a 64°F bedroom and keep the rest of the house at 70°F? During the cooling season you may want the room for the baby a little bit warmer than the rest of the house. The possibilities are endless.

What are we speaking of in dollars and cents?

Roughly speaking, if you control two rooms in your home during the winter heating season as follows:
The unused guest room you keep at 55°F.
The bedroom you keep at 64°F.
The square feet of those two rooms is about 15% of the total square feet of your home.
Expect to save between 4% and 8% on your utility bills during the heating season.
During the cooling season the savings will be even higher since cooling costs are greater than heating costs.

Cool. How does it work?

A ZoneMasterTM system consists of several elements

  1. A motorized, low voltage, damper that installs in the duct supplying air to the room you want to 'zone'.
  2. A safe, low voltage transformer to supply power for the damper electric motor.
  3. A standard heat-cool wall thermostat you install in the room you want to 'zone' (This thermostat is not supplied and must be obtained separately at your favorite home center).

 

What wiring is required?

You will need to install the transformer on the cover of an existing electrical junction box in your home. The ZoneMasterTM damper installs in the target duct, similar to the installation of an Inductor® In-Line Duct Booster Fan.
The thermostat is mounted on the wall in the target room.
You run low voltage wires from the transformer to the thermostat and on to the ZoneMasterTM drive motor.
This is safe low voltage wiring. View ZoneMasterTM installation instructions.

Is that room going to get stuffy if I shut off the air supply?

The ZoneMasterTM, with 100% airflow shut-off, can be used in dry climates and in rooms where some air exchange is present through air leakage via the windows or under the door. If you find the room getting stuffy, a small portion of the damper sealing gasket can be removed from the damper to allow some air supply.

How many rooms can I 'zone' in my house?

Do not use more than two ZoneMasterTM dampers per 10 heat registers. If you use more, chances are that the furnace blower will build up too much pressure. This may upset the balance of heat delivery in your home and create noise from heat outlets because the air velocity will be higher. (Same amount of air coming out of fewer registers).
Computerized whole house zone control systems are available, but they are rather expensive.

What is a Suncourt Motorized Damper?

Suncourt Motorized Dampers also known as Zone Dampers, Motorized Duct Dampers, or Automatic Dampers are mounted in ductwork to automatically shut off or open branches of the duct to airflow. They are available in normally open (power close) or normally closed (power open) configurations.

What would I use a Motorized Damper for?

 

  • Zone Control-Do you have a spare bedroom that you don’t want to fully heat or air condition because the room is rarely used? A Zone Damper will shut off air to that room’s registers and only allow air to flow again when temperatures in that room exceed or drop below your preset temperature. Zone Dampers are typically controlled by a thermostat or some type of master controller. Likewise Zone Dampers can control airflow to whole sections of a home or building to regulate temperature in those specific areas at certain times of the day, evening or the time of your choosing, which saves on heating and cooling bills.
  • Ventilation-Zone Dampers can open to allow temporary ventilation of homes, garages, greenhouses, or other rooms where fresh air intake or stale air outtake is required.

 

How does a Motorized Damper run?

Suncourt Automatic Dampers are 24-volt powered and require a transformer. Suncourt® ZoneMaster™ Dampers are often installed by homeowners and have a transformer included in the box. Suncourt Pro Dampers are often installed by professionals and do not have a transformer included in the box. Automatic Dampers can be wired to 24-volt thermostats. Suncourt Automatic Dampers feature a soft-stop, freewheeling coupling between the motor and the damper shaft, which greatly improves life over other similar style dampers on the market. Suncourt Automatic Dampers feature a hysteresis motor that is designed to hold the damper closed or open with power indefinitely.

What is Zone Control?

Zone Control refers to regulating the temperature in one single room in your home by means of shutting air supply to that room via the ductwork ON or OFF using a wall thermostat in that room combined with motorized damper in the duct supplying air to that room.

Why do I want to control the temperature in a single room?

To save significantly on home heating and cooling cost.

Give me an example of how I would save money:

O.K. Let us say you have a room in your home that is used only occasionally, like a guest room.
Why heat that room to 70°F all winter long, or cool it to 76°F all summer. Keep it at 55°F in the winter and 85°F in the summer. Same story for a bedroom. Like to sleep in a 64°F bedroom and keep the rest of the house at 70°F? During the cooling season you may want the room for the baby a little bit warmer than the rest of the house. The possibilities are endless.

What are we speaking of in dollars and cents?

Roughly speaking, if you control two rooms in your home during the winter heating season as follows:
The unused guest room you keep at 55°F.
The bedroom you keep at 64°F.
The square feet of those two rooms is about 15% of the total square feet of your home.
Expect to save between 4% and 8% on your utility bills during the heating season.
During the cooling season the savings will be even higher since cooling costs are greater than heating costs.

Cool. How does it work?

A ZoneMasterTM system consists of several elements

  1. A motorized, low voltage, damper that installs in the duct supplying air to the room you want to 'zone'.
  2. A safe, low voltage transformer to supply power for the damper electric motor.
  3. A standard heat-cool wall thermostat you install in the room you want to 'zone' (This thermostat is not supplied and must be obtained separately at your favorite home center).

 

What wiring is required?

You will need to install the transformer on the cover of an existing electrical junction box in your home. The ZoneMasterTM damper installs in the target duct, similar to the installation of an Inductor® In-Line Duct Booster Fan.
The thermostat is mounted on the wall in the target room.
You run low voltage wires from the transformer to the thermostat and on to the ZoneMasterTM drive motor.
This is safe low voltage wiring. View ZoneMasterTM Installation Page

Is that room going to get stuffy if I shut off the air supply?

The ZoneMasterTM, with 100% airflow shut-off, can be used in dry climates and in rooms where some air exchange is present through air leakage via the windows or under the door. If you find the room getting stuffy, a small portion of the damper sealing gasket can be removed from the damper to allow some air supply.

How many rooms can I 'zone' in my house?

Do not use more than two ZoneMasterTM dampers per 10 heat registers. If you use more, chances are that the furnace blower will build up too much pressure. This may upset the balance of heat delivery in your home and create noise from heat outlets because the air velocity will be higher. (Same amount of air coming out of fewer registers).
Computerized whole house zone control systems are available, but they are rather expensive.

Axial In-Line Duct Fans

NEVER expose your In-Line Duct Fan to airflow temperatures exceeding 140°F(60°C).

  • Make sure all electrical wiring conforms to all applicable codes and standards. If you are not familiar with electrical installations, consult a qualified electrician.
  • Never use an In-Line Duct Fan for dryer venting.
  • Never connect the High and Low speed wires of a 2-speed In-Line Duct Fan together.

Why do I have a room that is always too cold?
Your problem room may be located far from the furnace. Friction in the long duct reduces airflow to the register in that room, thus delivery of heated air. Also, perhaps the room is over an unheated garage or the duct is simply too small (undersized) to get enough heated air to that room. Remember too, when you are delivering heated air to a room, that air has to have a way to get out of that room. Otherwise there will be no air circulation. Does the room have an air return register? If not, is the door of that room kept closed, stopping air circulation?

Why do I have a room that is always too hot ?
The room that you have a cooling problem with may be far away from the central air system. Long duct runs cause reduction in airflow, plus, the cooled air may have heated up before it gets to the problem room. Perhaps the problem run is to a room on the South side of the house, which has a large window, catching a lot of summer heat.
Chances are that your 'hot' rooms are on the second level of your home. You see, cooled air is dense and heavy. It doesn't like to flow upstairs. This is a very common problem, worsened by undersized ductwork and inaccessibility of those ducts.
Particularly for upstairs cooling problems, select the largest fan you can fit and use duct diameter expanders & reducers to adapt to the ducts already in place.

What boost can I expect from an In-Line Duct Fan?
A standard floor or wall register is normally fed by a 6" diameter duct. You would like to boost the airflow from that register because you have a room that is usually cold in the winter or hot in the summer.
The airflow from that register may be as low as 20 or 30 Cubic Feet of air per minute.
Expect this particular example to have double the airflow when an In-Line Duct Fan is installed.

What temperature difference does boosted airflow make?
This is dependent on a host of variables. How well insulated is the room? What heat gain in the summer through a window? How far is the register from the furnace? Is this room over an unheated garage? Etc.
Here is an example:
During the winter heating season, you need a room about 4 °F warmer than it is. To achieve this you will need 11% more airflow out of the register(s) in that room assuming that your furnace runs 60 minutes out of the hour.
If your furnace runs 20 minutes out of the hour on a cold winter day, that is 1/3 of an hour. You will need 3 times the 11% or 33% boost. In most applications, an In-Line Duct Fan will boost up to 80%. Thus, well up to the task of warming up a room.

How loud will the installed fan be?
Suncourt fans are rated between 50-60 dBA. Please visit our Fan Noise & You information page.

How much power does an In-Line Duct Fan use?
Example: The DB206, 6" diameter In-Line Duct Fan is rated at 0.35 Amp.
For a 120 Volt product, that is 0.35 x 120 = 42 Watt.
This is the maximum motor STARTING Watts. Once the fan runs, the actual wattage is 27 Watts. Like a small light bulb. In the Suncourt product specifications section, Inductors are listed by Amperage. As a rule of thumb, running Amperage is about 60% of the listed (start) Amperage.
So, to figure it out: Listed Amperage times Voltage (120 Volt) equals startup Watts.
Actual running Watts are about 60% of that.

What type of motors are used in Suncourt products?
The electric motors used in Suncourt products are C-Frame two-pole motors, Class B, Thermally Protected, sleeve bearings and synthetic lubricant. The exceptions are the 400 Series In-Line Duct Fans which have 4-pole, Class B, Thermally Protected motors with sleeve bearings and synthetic lubricant.

Can I use a rheostat or fan speed control with an In-Line Duct Fan?
You can not use a rheostat. A rheostat lowers the voltage supplied to the fan motor. This will cause the motor to overheat and theThermal Protector will open, destroying the motor.
A solid-state fan speed control can be used. Suncourt sells two versions of a solid state fan speed controller. The VS100 is a hardwire version that is mounted in your wall similar to a light switch. The VS200 is a plug-in model that plugs into an outlet then the In-Line Duct Fan is plugged into the variable speed switch.

What does Thermally Protected mean?
A thermally Protected motor contains a fuse that will cut off power to the motor should the motor temperature exceed a safe limit. All Suncourt electric motors are Thermally Protected.

What are the fan blades made of?
The 4"-8" In-Line Duct Fan are equipped with Polycarbonate fan blades. (A high strength superior material as used for jet fighter canopies). The 10"-14"In-Line Duct Fans have aluminum fan blades.

How many Inductor fans can I install?
We recommend that you do not install more than 2 In-Line Duct Fans per 8 registers in your air distribution system.
Two boosters will not appreciably affect the airflow to the remaining registers.
If you install more than 2 In-Line Duct Fans per 8 registers, you may be lowering the airflow from a register in some other room in your home, thus creating temperature problems there.

Will an Inductor always double airflow from any register?
No. An In-Line Duct Fan will boost airflow more to a poorly performing register (which is the register needing help) than to a register that already has good airflow. As stated before, a poorly performing register may have double the airflow with an In-Line Duct Fan. A well performing register may have a 30% to 50% percent increase in airflow.

What is the difference between Free Air and Boosted Air?
Free air is the air volume output from a fan, expressed in Cubic Feet per Minute (CFM) when the fan is not connected to any ductwork, pipes, louvers or other items that would interfere with the free flow of air from the fan.
Boosted Air is the maximum airflow that can be passed through an In-Line Duct Fan in CFM before this fan, installed in a duct, becomes a hindrance to airflow rather than boosting an existing airflow.
Depending on the specifics of the electric motor and fan blade combination, Boosted Air can be between 50% to 100% greater than Free Air.

Can I "over boost" a register?
Suncourt In-Line Duct Fans are designed to provide progressive boost. This means that the airflow is proportionally boosted to the need of a particular register. Our booster fans are designed to run at a low RPM in free air. At this RPM, the fan motor runs below the peak torque that can be generated by the motor. Depending on the air blown into the intake side of the In-Line Duct Fan, the RPM will adjust itself as needed to provide boost and will operate at or near peak torque of the electric motor.

In what type of duct can I install an In-Line Duct Fan?
In-Line Duct Fans are suitable for installation in metal, flexible or high density pressed fiberglass ducts. The In-Line Duct Fan can be secured to the duct with screws or a good quality duct tape.

Can I build-in an In-Line Duct Fan, i.e. drywall or panel over it?
No. The In-Line Duct Fan must always remain accessible for service, cleaning or repair.

Can I use the In-Line Duct Fan to vent outside air?
The In-Line Duct Fan has to be protected from rain and excessive moisture.

What is the lowest airflow temperature for an In-Line Duct Fan?
To maintain good oiling of the motor bearings, we recommend a minimum temperature of 40°F (4°C).

What do I typically need for electrical installation?
You will need a small electrical box to mount on the In-Line Duct Fan.
We recommend #8 self-piercing or self-drilling sheet metal screws, ½" to 5/8" long. Do not pre-drill the electrical box mounting holes. Be sure these screws do not touch the fan blade or the electric motor.
For this box you will need a power supply strain relief to mount in a "knockout" in the electrical box.
Choose the power cable to conform to the applicable codes and standards. The staff at your favorite Home Center can recommend these materials to you.

Where do I get power from for the In-Line Duct Fan?
Here you have a number of options.
The easiest way to power your In-Line Duct Fan for automatic ON/OFF operation with both your furnace and air conditioner is to use the Suncourt DuctStat. Please view the DuctStat section of these FAQ's.
You may power the In-Line Duct Fan via a standard wall switch for manual ON/OFF operation. Running an In-Line Duct Fan continuously will not appreciably affect the life of the fan.
The next best is to connect to the wiring of your furnace. You must connect to the wire that provides power to your furnace blower. Consult the furnace wiring diagram, usually located on the inside of the panel covering the main furnace blower. Again make sure that all wiring conforms to all applicable standards and codes.
Also check that your furnace blower motor has a 110-120 Volt AC motor. Some larger furnaces have 220-240 Volt AC motors. Some of the newest high-end furnaces have DC motors. Do not connect the In-Line Duct Fan to either the 220-240 Volt AC or the DC type.
.
Because of the numerous variations in furnace wiring, Suncourt cannot advise you on the hookup.

Can I wire my two-speed In-Line Duct Fan to run on High or Low speed?
Yes, but first this warning. NEVER connect the High and Low speed wires together.
The motor wiring will burn out in a matter of seconds, permanently destroying the unit. Wire to operate either on High speed or Low speed. Never both.
You may use a Single Pole, Double Throw "ON-OFF-ON" toggle, rocker or other switch to wire for High or Low speed operation. This switch must be rated for 125 Volt AC, 10 Amp minimum. Now you can switch your 2-speed Inductor from High to Low speed and have a center OFF position. Connect the supply power to the C (common) terminal, the High speed wire from the motor to the terminal marked 1 and the Low speed wire from the motor to the terminal marked 2. Make sure that the wiring and enclosure for this switch conform to all applicable standards and codes.

Is the In-Line Duct Fan safe?
The In-Line Duct Fans have been rigorously tested to the Standards of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. and are listed by Intertech Testing, ETL® (C/US). All Inductors have Thermally Protected electric motors.

NEVER expose your In-Line Duct Fan to airflow temperatures exceeding 140°F(60°C).

  • Make sure all electrical wiring conforms to all applicable codes and standards. If you are not familiar with electrical installations, consult a qualified electrician.
  • Never use an In-Line Duct Fan for dryer venting.
  • Never connect the High and Low speed wires of a 2-speed In-Line Duct Fan together.

Why do I have a room that is always too cold?
Your problem room may be located far from the furnace. Friction in the long duct reduces airflow to the register in that room, thus delivery of heated air. Also, perhaps the room is over an unheated garage or the duct is simply too small (undersized) to get enough heated air to that room. Remember too, when you are delivering heated air to a room, that air has to have a way to get out of that room. Otherwise there will be no air circulation. Does the room have an air return register? If not, is the door of that room kept closed, stopping air circulation?

Why do I have a room that is always too hot ?
The room that you have a cooling problem with may be far away from the central air system. Long duct runs cause reduction in airflow, plus, the cooled air may have heated up before it gets to the problem room. Perhaps the problem run is to a room on the South side of the house, which has a large window, catching a lot of summer heat.
Chances are that your 'hot' rooms are on the second level of your home. You see, cooled air is dense and heavy. It doesn't like to flow upstairs. This is a very common problem, worsened by undersized ductwork and inaccessibility of those ducts.
Particularly for upstairs cooling problems, select the largest fan you can fit and use duct diameter expanders & reducers to adapt to the ducts already in place.

What boost can I expect from an In-Line Duct Fan?
A standard floor or wall register is normally fed by a 6" diameter duct. You would like to boost the airflow from that register because you have a room that is usually cold in the winter or hot in the summer.
The airflow from that register may be as low as 20 or 30 Cubic Feet of air per minute.
Expect this particular example to have double the airflow when an In-Line Duct Fan is installed.

What temperature difference does boosted airflow make?
This is dependent on a host of variables. How well insulated is the room? What heat gain in the summer through a window? How far is the register from the furnace? Is this room over an unheated garage? Etc.
Here is an example:
During the winter heating season, you need a room about 4 °F warmer than it is. To achieve this you will need 11% more airflow out of the register(s) in that room assuming that your furnace runs 60 minutes out of the hour.
If your furnace runs 20 minutes out of the hour on a cold winter day, that is 1/3 of an hour. You will need 3 times the 11% or 33% boost. In most applications, an In-Line Duct Fan will boost up to 80%. Thus, well up to the task of warming up a room.

How loud will the installed fan be?
Suncourt fans are rated between 50-60 dBA. Please visit our Fan Noise & You information page.

How much power does an In-Line Duct Fan use?
Example: The DB206, 6" diameter In-Line Duct Fan is rated at 0.35 Amp.
For a 120 Volt product, that is 0.35 x 120 = 42 Watt.
This is the maximum motor STARTING Watts. Once the fan runs, the actual wattage is 27 Watts. Like a small light bulb. In the Suncourt product specifications section, Inductors are listed by Amperage. As a rule of thumb, running Amperage is about 60% of the listed (start) Amperage.
So, to figure it out: Listed Amperage times Voltage (120 Volt) equals startup Watts.
Actual running Watts are about 60% of that.

What type of motors are used in Suncourt products?
The electric motors used in Suncourt products are C-Frame two-pole motors, Class B, Thermally Protected, sleeve bearings and synthetic lubricant. The exceptions are the 400 Series In-Line Duct Fans which have 4-pole, Class B, Thermally Protected motors with sleeve bearings and synthetic lubricant.

Can I use a rheostat or fan speed control with an In-Line Duct Fan?
You can not use a rheostat. A rheostat lowers the voltage supplied to the fan motor. This will cause the motor to overheat and theThermal Protector will open, destroying the motor.
A solid-state fan speed control can be used. Suncourt sells two versions of a solid state fan speed controller. The VS100 is a hardwire version that is mounted in your wall similar to a light switch. The VS200 is a plug-in model that plugs into an outlet then the In-Line Duct Fan is plugged into the variable speed switch.

What does Thermally Protected mean?
A thermally Protected motor contains a fuse that will cut off power to the motor should the motor temperature exceed a safe limit. All Suncourt electric motors are Thermally Protected.

What are the fan blades made of?
The 4"-8" In-Line Duct Fan are equipped with Polycarbonate fan blades. (A high strength superior material as used for jet fighter canopies). The 10"-14"In-Line Duct Fans have aluminum fan blades.

How many Inductor fans can I install?
We recommend that you do not install more than 2 In-Line Duct Fans per 8 registers in your air distribution system.
Two boosters will not appreciably affect the airflow to the remaining registers.
If you install more than 2 In-Line Duct Fans per 8 registers, you may be lowering the airflow from a register in some other room in your home, thus creating temperature problems there.

Will an Inductor always double airflow from any register?
No. An In-Line Duct Fan will boost airflow more to a poorly performing register (which is the register needing help) than to a register that already has good airflow. As stated before, a poorly performing register may have double the airflow with an In-Line Duct Fan. A well performing register may have a 30% to 50% percent increase in airflow.

What is the difference between Free Air and Boosted Air?
Free air is the air volume output from a fan, expressed in Cubic Feet per Minute (CFM) when the fan is not connected to any ductwork, pipes, louvers or other items that would interfere with the free flow of air from the fan.
Boosted Air is the maximum airflow that can be passed through an In-Line Duct Fan in CFM before this fan, installed in a duct, becomes a hindrance to airflow rather than boosting an existing airflow.
Depending on the specifics of the electric motor and fan blade combination, Boosted Air can be between 50% to 100% greater than Free Air.

Can I "over boost" a register?
Suncourt In-Line Duct Fans are designed to provide progressive boost. This means that the airflow is proportionally boosted to the need of a particular register. Our booster fans are designed to run at a low RPM in free air. At this RPM, the fan motor runs below the peak torque that can be generated by the motor. Depending on the air blown into the intake side of the In-Line Duct Fan, the RPM will adjust itself as needed to provide boost and will operate at or near peak torque of the electric motor.

In what type of duct can I install an In-Line Duct Fan?
In-Line Duct Fans are suitable for installation in metal, flexible or high density pressed fiberglass ducts. The In-Line Duct Fan can be secured to the duct with screws or a good quality duct tape.

Can I build-in an In-Line Duct Fan, i.e. drywall or panel over it?
No. The In-Line Duct Fan must always remain accessible for service, cleaning or repair.

Can I use the In-Line Duct Fan to vent outside air?
The In-Line Duct Fan has to be protected from rain and excessive moisture.

What is the lowest airflow temperature for an In-Line Duct Fan?
To maintain good oiling of the motor bearings, we recommend a minimum temperature of 40°F (4°C).

What do I typically need for electrical installation?
You will need a small electrical box to mount on the In-Line Duct Fan.
We recommend #8 self-piercing or self-drilling sheet metal screws, ½" to 5/8" long. Do not pre-drill the electrical box mounting holes. Be sure these screws do not touch the fan blade or the electric motor.
For this box you will need a power supply strain relief to mount in a "knockout" in the electrical box.
Choose the power cable to conform to the applicable codes and standards. The staff at your favorite Home Center can recommend these materials to you.

Where do I get power from for the In-Line Duct Fan?
Here you have a number of options.
The easiest way to power your In-Line Duct Fan for automatic ON/OFF operation with both your furnace and air conditioner is to use the Suncourt DuctStat. Please view the DuctStat section of these FAQ's.
You may power the In-Line Duct Fan via a standard wall switch for manual ON/OFF operation. Running an In-Line Duct Fan continuously will not appreciably affect the life of the fan.
The next best is to connect to the wiring of your furnace. You must connect to the wire that provides power to your furnace blower. Consult the furnace wiring diagram, usually located on the inside of the panel covering the main furnace blower. Again make sure that all wiring conforms to all applicable standards and codes.
Also check that your furnace blower motor has a 110-120 Volt AC motor. Some larger furnaces have 220-240 Volt AC motors. Some of the newest high-end furnaces have DC motors. Do not connect the In-Line Duct Fan to either the 220-240 Volt AC or the DC type.
.
Because of the numerous variations in furnace wiring, Suncourt cannot advise you on the hookup.

Can I wire my two-speed In-Line Duct Fan to run on High or Low speed?
Yes, but first this warning. NEVER connect the High and Low speed wires together.
The motor wiring will burn out in a matter of seconds, permanently destroying the unit. Wire to operate either on High speed or Low speed. Never both.
You may use a Single Pole, Double Throw "ON-OFF-ON" toggle, rocker or other switch to wire for High or Low speed operation. This switch must be rated for 125 Volt AC, 10 Amp minimum. Now you can switch your 2-speed Inductor from High to Low speed and have a center OFF position. Connect the supply power to the C (common) terminal, the High speed wire from the motor to the terminal marked 1 and the Low speed wire from the motor to the terminal marked 2. Make sure that the wiring and enclosure for this switch conform to all applicable standards and codes.

Is the In-Line Duct Fan safe?
The In-Line Duct Fans have been rigorously tested to the Standards of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. and are listed by Intertech Testing, ETL® (C/US). All Inductors have Thermally Protected electric motors.

NEVER expose your In-Line Duct Fan to airflow temperatures exceeding 140°F(60°C).

  • Make sure all electrical wiring conforms to all applicable codes and standards. If you are not familiar with electrical installations, consult a qualified electrician.
  • Never use an In-Line Duct Fan for dryer venting.
  • Never connect the High and Low speed wires of a 2-speed In-Line Duct Fan together.

Why do I have a room that is always too cold?
Your problem room may be located far from the furnace. Friction in the long duct reduces airflow to the register in that room, thus delivery of heated air. Also, perhaps the room is over an unheated garage or the duct is simply too small (undersized) to get enough heated air to that room. Remember too, when you are delivering heated air to a room, that air has to have a way to get out of that room. Otherwise there will be no air circulation. Does the room have an air return register? If not, is the door of that room kept closed, stopping air circulation?

Why do I have a room that is always too hot ?
The room that you have a cooling problem with may be far away from the central air system. Long duct runs cause reduction in airflow, plus, the cooled air may have heated up before it gets to the problem room. Perhaps the problem run is to a room on the South side of the house, which has a large window, catching a lot of summer heat.
Chances are that your 'hot' rooms are on the second level of your home. You see, cooled air is dense and heavy. It doesn't like to flow upstairs. This is a very common problem, worsened by undersized ductwork and inaccessibility of those ducts.
Particularly for upstairs cooling problems, select the largest fan you can fit and use duct diameter expanders & reducers to adapt to the ducts already in place.

What boost can I expect from an In-Line Duct Fan?
A standard floor or wall register is normally fed by a 6" diameter duct. You would like to boost the airflow from that register because you have a room that is usually cold in the winter or hot in the summer.
The airflow from that register may be as low as 20 or 30 Cubic Feet of air per minute.
Expect this particular example to have double the airflow when an In-Line Duct Fan is installed.

What temperature difference does boosted airflow make?
This is dependent on a host of variables. How well insulated is the room? What heat gain in the summer through a window? How far is the register from the furnace? Is this room over an unheated garage? Etc.
Here is an example:
During the winter heating season, you need a room about 4 °F warmer than it is. To achieve this you will need 11% more airflow out of the register(s) in that room assuming that your furnace runs 60 minutes out of the hour.
If your furnace runs 20 minutes out of the hour on a cold winter day, that is 1/3 of an hour. You will need 3 times the 11% or 33% boost. In most applications, an In-Line Duct Fan will boost up to 80%. Thus, well up to the task of warming up a room.

How loud will the installed fan be?
Suncourt fans are rated between 50-60 dBA. Please visit our Fan Noise & You information page.

How much power does an In-Line Duct Fan use?
Example: The DB206, 6" diameter In-Line Duct Fan is rated at 0.35 Amp.
For a 120 Volt product, that is 0.35 x 120 = 42 Watt.
This is the maximum motor STARTING Watts. Once the fan runs, the actual wattage is 27 Watts. Like a small light bulb. In the Suncourt product specifications section, Inductors are listed by Amperage. As a rule of thumb, running Amperage is about 60% of the listed (start) Amperage.
So, to figure it out: Listed Amperage times Voltage (120 Volt) equals startup Watts.
Actual running Watts are about 60% of that.

What type of motors are used in Suncourt products?
The electric motors used in Suncourt products are C-Frame two-pole motors, Class B, Thermally Protected, sleeve bearings and synthetic lubricant. The exceptions are the 400 Series In-Line Duct Fans which have 4-pole, Class B, Thermally Protected motors with sleeve bearings and synthetic lubricant.

Can I use a rheostat or fan speed control with an In-Line Duct Fan?
You can not use a rheostat. A rheostat lowers the voltage supplied to the fan motor. This will cause the motor to overheat and theThermal Protector will open, destroying the motor.
A solid-state fan speed control can be used. Suncourt sells two versions of a solid state fan speed controller. The VS100 is a hardwire version that is mounted in your wall similar to a light switch. The VS200 is a plug-in model that plugs into an outlet then the In-Line Duct Fan is plugged into the variable speed switch.

What does Thermally Protected mean?
A thermally Protected motor contains a fuse that will cut off power to the motor should the motor temperature exceed a safe limit. All Suncourt electric motors are Thermally Protected.

What are the fan blades made of?
The 4"-8" In-Line Duct Fan are equipped with Polycarbonate fan blades. (A high strength superior material as used for jet fighter canopies). The 10"-14"In-Line Duct Fans have aluminum fan blades.

How many Inductor fans can I install?
We recommend that you do not install more than 2 In-Line Duct Fans per 8 registers in your air distribution system.
Two boosters will not appreciably affect the airflow to the remaining registers.
If you install more than 2 In-Line Duct Fans per 8 registers, you may be lowering the airflow from a register in some other room in your home, thus creating temperature problems there.

Will an Inductor always double airflow from any register?
No. An In-Line Duct Fan will boost airflow more to a poorly performing register (which is the register needing help) than to a register that already has good airflow. As stated before, a poorly performing register may have double the airflow with an In-Line Duct Fan. A well performing register may have a 30% to 50% percent increase in airflow.

What is the difference between Free Air and Boosted Air?
Free air is the air volume output from a fan, expressed in Cubic Feet per Minute (CFM) when the fan is not connected to any ductwork, pipes, louvers or other items that would interfere with the free flow of air from the fan.
Boosted Air is the maximum airflow that can be passed through an In-Line Duct Fan in CFM before this fan, installed in a duct, becomes a hindrance to airflow rather than boosting an existing airflow.
Depending on the specifics of the electric motor and fan blade combination, Boosted Air can be between 50% to 100% greater than Free Air.

Can I "over boost" a register?
Suncourt In-Line Duct Fans are designed to provide progressive boost. This means that the airflow is proportionally boosted to the need of a particular register. Our booster fans are designed to run at a low RPM in free air. At this RPM, the fan motor runs below the peak torque that can be generated by the motor. Depending on the air blown into the intake side of the In-Line Duct Fan, the RPM will adjust itself as needed to provide boost and will operate at or near peak torque of the electric motor.

In what type of duct can I install an In-Line Duct Fan?
In-Line Duct Fans are suitable for installation in metal, flexible or high density pressed fiberglass ducts. The In-Line Duct Fan can be secured to the duct with screws or a good quality duct tape.

Can I build-in an In-Line Duct Fan, i.e. drywall or panel over it?
No. The In-Line Duct Fan must always remain accessible for service, cleaning or repair.

Can I use the In-Line Duct Fan to vent outside air?
The In-Line Duct Fan has to be protected from rain and excessive moisture.

What is the lowest airflow temperature for an In-Line Duct Fan?
To maintain good oiling of the motor bearings, we recommend a minimum temperature of 40°F (4°C).

What do I typically need for electrical installation?
You will need a small electrical box to mount on the In-Line Duct Fan.
We recommend #8 self-piercing or self-drilling sheet metal screws, ½" to 5/8" long. Do not pre-drill the electrical box mounting holes. Be sure these screws do not touch the fan blade or the electric motor.
For this box you will need a power supply strain relief to mount in a "knockout" in the electrical box.
Choose the power cable to conform to the applicable codes and standards. The staff at your favorite Home Center can recommend these materials to you.

Where do I get power from for the In-Line Duct Fan?
Here you have a number of options.
The easiest way to power your In-Line Duct Fan for automatic ON/OFF operation with both your furnace and air conditioner is to use the Suncourt DuctStat. Please view the DuctStat section of these FAQ's.
You may power the In-Line Duct Fan via a standard wall switch for manual ON/OFF operation. Running an In-Line Duct Fan continuously will not appreciably affect the life of the fan.
The next best is to connect to the wiring of your furnace. You must connect to the wire that provides power to your furnace blower. Consult the furnace wiring diagram, usually located on the inside of the panel covering the main furnace blower. Again make sure that all wiring conforms to all applicable standards and codes.
Also check that your furnace blower motor has a 110-120 Volt AC motor. Some larger furnaces have 220-240 Volt AC motors. Some of the newest high-end furnaces have DC motors. Do not connect the In-Line Duct Fan to either the 220-240 Volt AC or the DC type.
.
Because of the numerous variations in furnace wiring, Suncourt cannot advise you on the hookup.

Can I wire my two-speed In-Line Duct Fan to run on High or Low speed?
Yes, but first this warning. NEVER connect the High and Low speed wires together.
The motor wiring will burn out in a matter of seconds, permanently destroying the unit. Wire to operate either on High speed or Low speed. Never both.
You may use a Single Pole, Double Throw "ON-OFF-ON" toggle, rocker or other switch to wire for High or Low speed operation. This switch must be rated for 125 Volt AC, 10 Amp minimum. Now you can switch your 2-speed Inductor from High to Low speed and have a center OFF position. Connect the supply power to the C (common) terminal, the High speed wire from the motor to the terminal marked 1 and the Low speed wire from the motor to the terminal marked 2. Make sure that the wiring and enclosure for this switch conform to all applicable standards and codes.

Is the In-Line Duct Fan safe?
The In-Line Duct Fans have been rigorously tested to the Standards of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. and are listed by Intertech Testing, ETL® (C/US). All Inductors have Thermally Protected electric motors.

NEVER expose your In-Line Duct Fan to airflow temperatures exceeding 140°F(60°C).

  • Make sure all electrical wiring conforms to all applicable codes and standards. If you are not familiar with electrical installations, consult a qualified electrician.
  • Never use an In-Line Duct Fan for dryer venting.
  • Never connect the High and Low speed wires of a 2-speed In-Line Duct Fan together.

Why do I have a room that is always too cold?
Your problem room may be located far from the furnace. Friction in the long duct reduces airflow to the register in that room, thus delivery of heated air. Also, perhaps the room is over an unheated garage or the duct is simply too small (undersized) to get enough heated air to that room. Remember too, when you are delivering heated air to a room, that air has to have a way to get out of that room. Otherwise there will be no air circulation. Does the room have an air return register? If not, is the door of that room kept closed, stopping air circulation?

Why do I have a room that is always too hot ?
The room that you have a cooling problem with may be far away from the central air system. Long duct runs cause reduction in airflow, plus, the cooled air may have heated up before it gets to the problem room. Perhaps the problem run is to a room on the South side of the house, which has a large window, catching a lot of summer heat.
Chances are that your 'hot' rooms are on the second level of your home. You see, cooled air is dense and heavy. It doesn't like to flow upstairs. This is a very common problem, worsened by undersized ductwork and inaccessibility of those ducts.
Particularly for upstairs cooling problems, select the largest fan you can fit and use duct diameter expanders & reducers to adapt to the ducts already in place.

What boost can I expect from an In-Line Duct Fan?
A standard floor or wall register is normally fed by a 6" diameter duct. You would like to boost the airflow from that register because you have a room that is usually cold in the winter or hot in the summer.
The airflow from that register may be as low as 20 or 30 Cubic Feet of air per minute.
Expect this particular example to have double the airflow when an In-Line Duct Fan is installed.

What temperature difference does boosted airflow make?
This is dependent on a host of variables. How well insulated is the room? What heat gain in the summer through a window? How far is the register from the furnace? Is this room over an unheated garage? Etc.
Here is an example:
During the winter heating season, you need a room about 4 °F warmer than it is. To achieve this you will need 11% more airflow out of the register(s) in that room assuming that your furnace runs 60 minutes out of the hour.
If your furnace runs 20 minutes out of the hour on a cold winter day, that is 1/3 of an hour. You will need 3 times the 11% or 33% boost. In most applications, an In-Line Duct Fan will boost up to 80%. Thus, well up to the task of warming up a room.

How loud will the installed fan be?
Suncourt fans are rated between 50-60 dBA. Please visit our Fan Noise & You information page.

How much power does an In-Line Duct Fan use?
Example: The DB206, 6" diameter In-Line Duct Fan is rated at 0.35 Amp.
For a 120 Volt product, that is 0.35 x 120 = 42 Watt.
This is the maximum motor STARTING Watts. Once the fan runs, the actual wattage is 27 Watts. Like a small light bulb. In the Suncourt product specifications section, Inductors are listed by Amperage. As a rule of thumb, running Amperage is about 60% of the listed (start) Amperage.
So, to figure it out: Listed Amperage times Voltage (120 Volt) equals startup Watts.
Actual running Watts are about 60% of that.

What type of motors are used in Suncourt products?
The electric motors used in Suncourt products are C-Frame two-pole motors, Class B, Thermally Protected, sleeve bearings and synthetic lubricant. The exceptions are the 400 Series In-Line Duct Fans which have 4-pole, Class B, Thermally Protected motors with sleeve bearings and synthetic lubricant.

Can I use a rheostat or fan speed control with an In-Line Duct Fan?
You can not use a rheostat. A rheostat lowers the voltage supplied to the fan motor. This will cause the motor to overheat and theThermal Protector will open, destroying the motor.
A solid-state fan speed control can be used. Suncourt sells two versions of a solid state fan speed controller. The VS100 is a hardwire version that is mounted in your wall similar to a light switch. The VS200 is a plug-in model that plugs into an outlet then the In-Line Duct Fan is plugged into the variable speed switch.

What does Thermally Protected mean?
A thermally Protected motor contains a fuse that will cut off power to the motor should the motor temperature exceed a safe limit. All Suncourt electric motors are Thermally Protected.

What are the fan blades made of?
The 4"-8" In-Line Duct Fan are equipped with Polycarbonate fan blades. (A high strength superior material as used for jet fighter canopies). The 10"-14"In-Line Duct Fans have aluminum fan blades.

How many Inductor fans can I install?
We recommend that you do not install more than 2 In-Line Duct Fans per 8 registers in your air distribution system.
Two boosters will not appreciably affect the airflow to the remaining registers.
If you install more than 2 In-Line Duct Fans per 8 registers, you may be lowering the airflow from a register in some other room in your home, thus creating temperature problems there.

Will an Inductor always double airflow from any register?
No. An In-Line Duct Fan will boost airflow more to a poorly performing register (which is the register needing help) than to a register that already has good airflow. As stated before, a poorly performing register may have double the airflow with an In-Line Duct Fan. A well performing register may have a 30% to 50% percent increase in airflow.

What is the difference between Free Air and Boosted Air?
Free air is the air volume output from a fan, expressed in Cubic Feet per Minute (CFM) when the fan is not connected to any ductwork, pipes, louvers or other items that would interfere with the free flow of air from the fan.
Boosted Air is the maximum airflow that can be passed through an In-Line Duct Fan in CFM before this fan, installed in a duct, becomes a hindrance to airflow rather than boosting an existing airflow.
Depending on the specifics of the electric motor and fan blade combination, Boosted Air can be between 50% to 100% greater than Free Air.

Can I "over boost" a register?
Suncourt In-Line Duct Fans are designed to provide progressive boost. This means that the airflow is proportionally boosted to the need of a particular register. Our booster fans are designed to run at a low RPM in free air. At this RPM, the fan motor runs below the peak torque that can be generated by the motor. Depending on the air blown into the intake side of the In-Line Duct Fan, the RPM will adjust itself as needed to provide boost and will operate at or near peak torque of the electric motor.

In what type of duct can I install an In-Line Duct Fan?
In-Line Duct Fans are suitable for installation in metal, flexible or high density pressed fiberglass ducts. The In-Line Duct Fan can be secured to the duct with screws or a good quality duct tape.

Can I build-in an In-Line Duct Fan, i.e. drywall or panel over it?
No. The In-Line Duct Fan must always remain accessible for service, cleaning or repair.

Can I use the In-Line Duct Fan to vent outside air?
The In-Line Duct Fan has to be protected from rain and excessive moisture.

What is the lowest airflow temperature for an In-Line Duct Fan?
To maintain good oiling of the motor bearings, we recommend a minimum temperature of 40°F (4°C).

What do I typically need for electrical installation?
You will need a small electrical box to mount on the In-Line Duct Fan.
We recommend #8 self-piercing or self-drilling sheet metal screws, ½" to 5/8" long. Do not pre-drill the electrical box mounting holes. Be sure these screws do not touch the fan blade or the electric motor.
For this box you will need a power supply strain relief to mount in a "knockout" in the electrical box.
Choose the power cable to conform to the applicable codes and standards. The staff at your favorite Home Center can recommend these materials to you.

Where do I get power from for the In-Line Duct Fan?
Here you have a number of options.
The easiest way to power your In-Line Duct Fan for automatic ON/OFF operation with both your furnace and air conditioner is to use the Suncourt DuctStat. Please view the DuctStat section of these FAQ's.
You may power the In-Line Duct Fan via a standard wall switch for manual ON/OFF operation. Running an In-Line Duct Fan continuously will not appreciably affect the life of the fan.
The next best is to connect to the wiring of your furnace. You must connect to the wire that provides power to your furnace blower. Consult the furnace wiring diagram, usually located on the inside of the panel covering the main furnace blower. Again make sure that all wiring conforms to all applicable standards and codes.
Also check that your furnace blower motor has a 110-120 Volt AC motor. Some larger furnaces have 220-240 Volt AC motors. Some of the newest high-end furnaces have DC motors. Do not connect the In-Line Duct Fan to either the 220-240 Volt AC or the DC type.
.
Because of the numerous variations in furnace wiring, Suncourt cannot advise you on the hookup.

Can I wire my two-speed In-Line Duct Fan to run on High or Low speed?
Yes, but first this warning. NEVER connect the High and Low speed wires together.
The motor wiring will burn out in a matter of seconds, permanently destroying the unit. Wire to operate either on High speed or Low speed. Never both.
You may use a Single Pole, Double Throw "ON-OFF-ON" toggle, rocker or other switch to wire for High or Low speed operation. This switch must be rated for 125 Volt AC, 10 Amp minimum. Now you can switch your 2-speed Inductor from High to Low speed and have a center OFF position. Connect the supply power to the C (common) terminal, the High speed wire from the motor to the terminal marked 1 and the Low speed wire from the motor to the terminal marked 2. Make sure that the wiring and enclosure for this switch conform to all applicable standards and codes.

Is the In-Line Duct Fan safe?
The In-Line Duct Fans have been rigorously tested to the Standards of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. and are listed by Intertech Testing, ETL® (C/US). All Inductors have Thermally Protected electric motors.

NEVER expose your In-Line Duct Fan to airflow temperatures exceeding 140°F(60°C).

  • Make sure all electrical wiring conforms to all applicable codes and standards. If you are not familiar with electrical installations, consult a qualified electrician.
  • Never use an In-Line Duct Fan for dryer venting.
  • Never connect the High and Low speed wires of a 2-speed In-Line Duct Fan together.

Why do I have a room that is always too cold?
Your problem room may be located far from the furnace. Friction in the long duct reduces airflow to the register in that room, thus delivery of heated air. Also, perhaps the room is over an unheated garage or the duct is simply too small (undersized) to get enough heated air to that room. Remember too, when you are delivering heated air to a room, that air has to have a way to get out of that room. Otherwise there will be no air circulation. Does the room have an air return register? If not, is the door of that room kept closed, stopping air circulation?

Why do I have a room that is always too hot ?
The room that you have a cooling problem with may be far away from the central air system. Long duct runs cause reduction in airflow, plus, the cooled air may have heated up before it gets to the problem room. Perhaps the problem run is to a room on the South side of the house, which has a large window, catching a lot of summer heat.
Chances are that your 'hot' rooms are on the second level of your home. You see, cooled air is dense and heavy. It doesn't like to flow upstairs. This is a very common problem, worsened by undersized ductwork and inaccessibility of those ducts.
Particularly for upstairs cooling problems, select the largest fan you can fit and use duct diameter expanders & reducers to adapt to the ducts already in place.

What boost can I expect from an In-Line Duct Fan?
A standard floor or wall register is normally fed by a 6" diameter duct. You would like to boost the airflow from that register because you have a room that is usually cold in the winter or hot in the summer.
The airflow from that register may be as low as 20 or 30 Cubic Feet of air per minute.
Expect this particular example to have double the airflow when an In-Line Duct Fan is installed.

What temperature difference does boosted airflow make?
This is dependent on a host of variables. How well insulated is the room? What heat gain in the summer through a window? How far is the register from the furnace? Is this room over an unheated garage? Etc.
Here is an example:
During the winter heating season, you need a room about 4 °F warmer than it is. To achieve this you will need 11% more airflow out of the register(s) in that room assuming that your furnace runs 60 minutes out of the hour.
If your furnace runs 20 minutes out of the hour on a cold winter day, that is 1/3 of an hour. You will need 3 times the 11% or 33% boost. In most applications, an In-Line Duct Fan will boost up to 80%. Thus, well up to the task of warming up a room.

How loud will the installed fan be?
Suncourt fans are rated between 50-60 dBA. Please visit our Fan Noise & You information page.

How much power does an In-Line Duct Fan use?
Example: The DB206, 6" diameter In-Line Duct Fan is rated at 0.35 Amp.
For a 120 Volt product, that is 0.35 x 120 = 42 Watt.
This is the maximum motor STARTING Watts. Once the fan runs, the actual wattage is 27 Watts. Like a small light bulb. In the Suncourt product specifications section, Inductors are listed by Amperage. As a rule of thumb, running Amperage is about 60% of the listed (start) Amperage.
So, to figure it out: Listed Amperage times Voltage (120 Volt) equals startup Watts.
Actual running Watts are about 60% of that.

What type of motors are used in Suncourt products?
The electric motors used in Suncourt products are C-Frame two-pole motors, Class B, Thermally Protected, sleeve bearings and synthetic lubricant. The exceptions are the 400 Series In-Line Duct Fans which have 4-pole, Class B, Thermally Protected motors with sleeve bearings and synthetic lubricant.

Can I use a rheostat or fan speed control with an In-Line Duct Fan?
You can not use a rheostat. A rheostat lowers the voltage supplied to the fan motor. This will cause the motor to overheat and theThermal Protector will open, destroying the motor.
A solid-state fan speed control can be used. Suncourt sells two versions of a solid state fan speed controller. The VS100 is a hardwire version that is mounted in your wall similar to a light switch. The VS200 is a plug-in model that plugs into an outlet then the In-Line Duct Fan is plugged into the variable speed switch.

What does Thermally Protected mean?
A thermally Protected motor contains a fuse that will cut off power to the motor should the motor temperature exceed a safe limit. All Suncourt electric motors are Thermally Protected.

What are the fan blades made of?
The 4"-8" In-Line Duct Fan are equipped with Polycarbonate fan blades. (A high strength superior material as used for jet fighter canopies). The 10"-14"In-Line Duct Fans have aluminum fan blades.

How many Inductor fans can I install?
We recommend that you do not install more than 2 In-Line Duct Fans per 8 registers in your air distribution system.
Two boosters will not appreciably affect the airflow to the remaining registers.
If you install more than 2 In-Line Duct Fans per 8 registers, you may be lowering the airflow from a register in some other room in your home, thus creating temperature problems there.

Will an Inductor always double airflow from any register?
No. An In-Line Duct Fan will boost airflow more to a poorly performing register (which is the register needing help) than to a register that already has good airflow. As stated before, a poorly performing register may have double the airflow with an In-Line Duct Fan. A well performing register may have a 30% to 50% percent increase in airflow.

What is the difference between Free Air and Boosted Air?
Free air is the air volume output from a fan, expressed in Cubic Feet per Minute (CFM) when the fan is not connected to any ductwork, pipes, louvers or other items that would interfere with the free flow of air from the fan.
Boosted Air is the maximum airflow that can be passed through an In-Line Duct Fan in CFM before this fan, installed in a duct, becomes a hindrance to airflow rather than boosting an existing airflow.
Depending on the specifics of the electric motor and fan blade combination, Boosted Air can be between 50% to 100% greater than Free Air.

Can I "over boost" a register?
Suncourt In-Line Duct Fans are designed to provide progressive boost. This means that the airflow is proportionally boosted to the need of a particular register. Our booster fans are designed to run at a low RPM in free air. At this RPM, the fan motor runs below the peak torque that can be generated by the motor. Depending on the air blown into the intake side of the In-Line Duct Fan, the RPM will adjust itself as needed to provide boost and will operate at or near peak torque of the electric motor.

In what type of duct can I install an In-Line Duct Fan?
In-Line Duct Fans are suitable for installation in metal, flexible or high density pressed fiberglass ducts. The In-Line Duct Fan can be secured to the duct with screws or a good quality duct tape.

Can I build-in an In-Line Duct Fan, i.e. drywall or panel over it?
No. The In-Line Duct Fan must always remain accessible for service, cleaning or repair.

Can I use the In-Line Duct Fan to vent outside air?
The In-Line Duct Fan has to be protected from rain and excessive moisture.

What is the lowest airflow temperature for an In-Line Duct Fan?
To maintain good oiling of the motor bearings, we recommend a minimum temperature of 40°F (4°C).

What do I typically need for electrical installation?
You will need a small electrical box to mount on the In-Line Duct Fan.
We recommend #8 self-piercing or self-drilling sheet metal screws, ½" to 5/8" long. Do not pre-drill the electrical box mounting holes. Be sure these screws do not touch the fan blade or the electric motor.
For this box you will need a power supply strain relief to mount in a "knockout" in the electrical box.
Choose the power cable to conform to the applicable codes and standards. The staff at your favorite Home Center can recommend these materials to you.

Where do I get power from for the In-Line Duct Fan?
Here you have a number of options.
The easiest way to power your In-Line Duct Fan for automatic ON/OFF operation with both your furnace and air conditioner is to use the Suncourt DuctStat. Please view the DuctStat section of these FAQ's.
You may power the In-Line Duct Fan via a standard wall switch for manual ON/OFF operation. Running an In-Line Duct Fan continuously will not appreciably affect the life of the fan.
The next best is to connect to the wiring of your furnace. You must connect to the wire that provides power to your furnace blower. Consult the furnace wiring diagram, usually located on the inside of the panel covering the main furnace blower. Again make sure that all wiring conforms to all applicable standards and codes.
Also check that your furnace blower motor has a 110-120 Volt AC motor. Some larger furnaces have 220-240 Volt AC motors. Some of the newest high-end furnaces have DC motors. Do not connect the In-Line Duct Fan to either the 220-240 Volt AC or the DC type.
.
Because of the numerous variations in furnace wiring, Suncourt cannot advise you on the hookup.

Can I wire my two-speed In-Line Duct Fan to run on High or Low speed?
Yes, but first this warning. NEVER connect the High and Low speed wires together.
The motor wiring will burn out in a matter of seconds, permanently destroying the unit. Wire to operate either on High speed or Low speed. Never both.
You may use a Single Pole, Double Throw "ON-OFF-ON" toggle, rocker or other switch to wire for High or Low speed operation. This switch must be rated for 125 Volt AC, 10 Amp minimum. Now you can switch your 2-speed Inductor from High to Low speed and have a center OFF position. Connect the supply power to the C (common) terminal, the High speed wire from the motor to the terminal marked 1 and the Low speed wire from the motor to the terminal marked 2. Make sure that the wiring and enclosure for this switch conform to all applicable standards and codes.

Is the In-Line Duct Fan safe?
The In-Line Duct Fans have been rigorously tested to the Standards of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. and are listed by Intertech Testing, ETL® (C/US). All Inductors have Thermally Protected electric motors.

Centrifugal In-Line Fans

NEVER expose your Centrax® Centrifugal Fan to airflow temperatures exceeding 140°F (60°C).

Make sure all electrical wiring conforms to all applicable codes and standards. If you are not familiar with electrical installations, consult a qualified electrician.

How much power does a Centrax® Centrifugal Fan use?

TF104: 77 Running Watts
TF106: 111 Running Watts
TF108: 155 Running Watts
TF110: 230 Running Watts
TF112: 170 Running Watts

What type of motor is used in Centrax® Centrifugal Fans?

The electric motor is a Class F sealed, thermally protected, auto-reset, external rotor motor with ball bearing.

Can I use a Centrax® Centrifugal Fan for dryer boosting?

Yes, Suncourt has a dryer boosting kit that includes the fan, current switch and mounting hardware for the installation.

Can I use a Centrax® Centrifugal Fan in a humid environment?

Yes, the Centrax® Fan utilizes a sealed motor that can withstand humid/damp environments. Please use the appropriate strain relief for your application.

Can I use a rheostat or fan speed control with Centrax® Centrifugal Fans?

Suncourt has a speed controller available that is matched to the Centrax® line of fans.

What does Thermally Protected mean?

A thermally protected motor contains a fuse that will cut off power to the motor should the motor temperature exceed a safe limit. Centrax® Centrifugal Fans contain an auto-resetting feature.

What are the impellers made of?

Glass filled nylon with a flame rating of UL94VO.

Can I build-in a Centrax®, i.e. drywall or panel over it?

No. The Centrax® must always remain accessible for service, cleaning or repair.

Can I use the Centrax® to vent outside air?

Yes.

What is the lowest airflow temperature for a Centrax®?

To maintain good oiling of the motor bearings, we recommend a minimum temperature of -30 °F (-34.4°C).

What do I typically need for electrical installation?

Provided in the box is the hardware for mounting the Centrax® Centrifugal Fan. You will need to provide an appropriate strain-relief and the code-correct wire to bring power to the fan. You will also need a screwdriver, duct tape, drill, and pliers depending on your installation.

Is the Centrax® safe?

The Centrax® fans have been rigorously tested to the Standards of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. and have an ETL listing.

NEVER expose your Centrax® Centrifugal Fan to airflow temperatures exceeding 140°F (60°C).

Make sure all electrical wiring conforms to all applicable codes and standards. If you are not familiar with electrical installations, consult a qualified electrician.

How much power does a Centrax® Centrifugal Fan use?

TF104: 77 Running Watts
TF106: 111 Running Watts
TF108: 155 Running Watts
TF110: 230 Running Watts
TF112: 170 Running Watts

What type of motor is used in Centrax® Centrifugal Fans?

The electric motor is a Class F sealed, thermally protected, auto-reset, external rotor motor with ball bearing.

Can I use a Centrax® Centrifugal Fan for dryer boosting?

Yes, Suncourt has a dryer boosting kit that includes the fan, current switch and mounting hardware for the installation.

Can I use a Centrax® Centrifugal Fan in a humid environment?

Yes, the Centrax® Fan utilizes a sealed motor that can withstand humid/damp environments. Please use the appropriate strain relief for your application.

Can I use a rheostat or fan speed control with Centrax® Centrifugal Fans?

Suncourt has a speed controller available that is matched to the Centrax® line of fans.

What does Thermally Protected mean?

A thermally protected motor contains a fuse that will cut off power to the motor should the motor temperature exceed a safe limit. Centrax® Centrifugal Fans contain an auto-resetting feature.

What are the impellers made of?

Glass filled nylon with a flame rating of UL94VO.

Can I build-in a Centrax®, i.e. drywall or panel over it?

No. The Centrax® must always remain accessible for service, cleaning or repair.

Can I use the Centrax® to vent outside air?

Yes.

What is the lowest airflow temperature for a Centrax®?

To maintain good oiling of the motor bearings, we recommend a minimum temperature of -30 °F (-34.4°C).

What do I typically need for electrical installation?

Provided in the box is the hardware for mounting the Centrax® Centrifugal Fan. You will need to provide an appropriate strain-relief and the code-correct wire to bring power to the fan. You will also need a screwdriver, duct tape, drill, and pliers depending on your installation.

Is the Centrax® safe?

The Centrax® fans have been rigorously tested to the Standards of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. and have an ETL listing.

NEVER expose your Centrax® Centrifugal Fan to airflow temperatures exceeding 140°F (60°C).

Make sure all electrical wiring conforms to all applicable codes and standards. If you are not familiar with electrical installations, consult a qualified electrician.

How much power does a Centrax® Centrifugal Fan use?

TF104: 77 Running Watts
TF106: 111 Running Watts
TF108: 155 Running Watts
TF110: 230 Running Watts
TF112: 170 Running Watts

What type of motor is used in Centrax® Centrifugal Fans?

The electric motor is a Class F sealed, thermally protected, auto-reset, external rotor motor with ball bearing.

Can I use a Centrax® Centrifugal Fan for dryer boosting?

Yes, Suncourt has a dryer boosting kit that includes the fan, current switch and mounting hardware for the installation.

Can I use a Centrax® Centrifugal Fan in a humid environment?

Yes, the Centrax® Fan utilizes a sealed motor that can withstand humid/damp environments. Please use the appropriate strain relief for your application.

Can I use a rheostat or fan speed control with Centrax® Centrifugal Fans?

Suncourt has a speed controller available that is matched to the Centrax® line of fans.

What does Thermally Protected mean?

A thermally protected motor contains a fuse that will cut off power to the motor should the motor temperature exceed a safe limit. Centrax® Centrifugal Fans contain an auto-resetting feature.

What are the impellers made of?

Glass filled nylon with a flame rating of UL94VO.

Can I build-in a Centrax®, i.e. drywall or panel over it?

No. The Centrax® must always remain accessible for service, cleaning or repair.

Can I use the Centrax® to vent outside air?

Yes.

What is the lowest airflow temperature for a Centrax®?

To maintain good oiling of the motor bearings, we recommend a minimum temperature of -30 °F (-34.4°C).

What do I typically need for electrical installation?

Provided in the box is the hardware for mounting the Centrax® Centrifugal Fan. You will need to provide an appropriate strain-relief and the code-correct wire to bring power to the fan. You will also need a screwdriver, duct tape, drill, and pliers depending on your installation.

Is the Centrax® safe?

The Centrax® fans have been rigorously tested to the Standards of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. and have an ETL listing.

NEVER expose your Centrax® Centrifugal Fan to airflow temperatures exceeding 140°F (60°C).

Make sure all electrical wiring conforms to all applicable codes and standards. If you are not familiar with electrical installations, consult a qualified electrician.

How much power does a Centrax® Centrifugal Fan use?

TF104: 77 Running Watts
TF106: 111 Running Watts
TF108: 155 Running Watts
TF110: 230 Running Watts
TF112: 170 Running Watts

What type of motor is used in Centrax® Centrifugal Fans?

The electric motor is a Class F sealed, thermally protected, auto-reset, external rotor motor with ball bearing.

Can I use a Centrax® Centrifugal Fan for dryer boosting?

Yes, Suncourt has a dryer boosting kit that includes the fan, current switch and mounting hardware for the installation.

Can I use a Centrax® Centrifugal Fan in a humid environment?

Yes, the Centrax® Fan utilizes a sealed motor that can withstand humid/damp environments. Please use the appropriate strain relief for your application.

Can I use a rheostat or fan speed control with Centrax® Centrifugal Fans?

Suncourt has a speed controller available that is matched to the Centrax® line of fans.

What does Thermally Protected mean?

A thermally protected motor contains a fuse that will cut off power to the motor should the motor temperature exceed a safe limit. Centrax® Centrifugal Fans contain an auto-resetting feature.

What are the impellers made of?

Glass filled nylon with a flame rating of UL94VO.

Can I build-in a Centrax®, i.e. drywall or panel over it?

No. The Centrax® must always remain accessible for service, cleaning or repair.

Can I use the Centrax® to vent outside air?

Yes.

What is the lowest airflow temperature for a Centrax®?

To maintain good oiling of the motor bearings, we recommend a minimum temperature of -30 °F (-34.4°C).

What do I typically need for electrical installation?

Provided in the box is the hardware for mounting the Centrax® Centrifugal Fan. You will need to provide an appropriate strain-relief and the code-correct wire to bring power to the fan. You will also need a screwdriver, duct tape, drill, and pliers depending on your installation.

Is the Centrax® safe?

The Centrax® fans have been rigorously tested to the Standards of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. and have an ETL listing.

Controllers

Door Frame Fan

What will the EntréeAir® do for me?
The EntreeAir® is designed to be mounted in a doorway and move air from one room to another.

Why would I want to move air from one room to another?
If you have a fireplace in one room, you may want to share some of that heat with an adjacent room in the winter.
Similarly, if you have a window air conditioner in one room, you may want to blow some of that cooled air into an adjacent space.
The EntreeAir® is also very effective in maintaining some airflow into a room that seems stuffy.

How much air does the EntreeAir® move?
The EntreeAir® moves approximately 100 Cubic Feet of air per Minute (CFM). To put that in perspective, a 12' x 18' room contains about 1700 cubic feet of air. At 100 Cubic Feet per Minute, divide the room volume by the 100 CFM, which gives approximately 17. That means the entire air volume of that room is moved every 17 minutes.

How much electricity does the EntreeAir® use?
The EntreeAir® uses 20 Watts of electricity. Like a small light bulb.

How do I install the EntreeAir®?
The EntreeAir® mounts on the doorframe. There are keyhole slots in both straight sides of the unit. Simply install two screws in the doorframe and hang the EntreeAir® with the keyhole slots over these screws.

Can I control which direction the air flows?
Yes, because the EntreeAir® has two sets of keyhole slots, you can hang it blowing into or out of a room.

How quiet is the EntreeAir®?
Very quiet. The sound level is 50dBA, about the same as the fan of a desktop computer.
Visit the quality control page.

How long is the power cord?
The power cord is 10 feet long and has an in-cord on/off switch.

Can I close the door with an EntreeAir® installed?
Yes. The EntreeAir® mounts beside the wood doorstop strip, opposite from when the door closes against.

How do I clean my EntreeAir®?
Your EntreeAir® will accumulate some dust over the years. Simply blow out that dust occasionally or use a small brush or cotton swabs to clean the interior.
Never open the housing of your EntreeAir®. This will void the warranty and constitutes a serious safety hazard.
Operating the EntreeAir® in a clean household and changing the filter of your central air system regularly will help keep the EntreeAir® clean.

Can I run the EntreeAir® continuously?
Yes, the electric motor is designed for many years of continuous operation.

Is the EntreeAir® safe?
Yes. Conforms to ANSI/UL Standard 507 & Certified to CSA C22.2 No. 113. The housing is made of a flame retardant ABS material. The electric motor is a Class B, Thermally Protected motor.

Dryer Booster Kit

How would I know if I need a booster fan for my clothes dryer? 

All clothes dryers require adequate exhaust airflow to function properly.  When that airflow is reduced, the clothes dryer performance is negatively affected.  Without adequate airflow, not only will the clothes dryer take longer to perform its task and use more energy, but lint can accumulate inside the duct system and inside the dryer itself over time.  

Sometimes all you need to restore your dryer's performance is a good professional cleaning of your dryer and duct system.  If you have noticed that your clothes dryer doesn't perform as well as it used to, this is an indicator that lint buildup may be at fault.  But it is important to also examine what allowed the lint to excessively accumulate inside the duct in the first place.  Lint accumulation is normal and requires periodic cleaning of both the duct and dryer, but a correctly installed dryer with a properly designed duct system shouldn't allow lint to accumulate excessively.  Excessive lint-buildup and airflow problems can sometimes be resolved by taking a careful look at your dryer duct system. 

Sometimes the problem is the duct design itself.  If you have noticed that your clothes dryer has never performed well, this may be the cause.  Safety standards such as UL and CSA define adequate dryer duct air velocity as 1200 feet per minute (FPM).  This air velocity is considered adequate to move entrained lint through the duct and out of the vent.  Most residential clothes dryers are equipped to provide this air velocity up to a certain amount of "equivalent length" of ductwork, and each is rated for a specific maximum equivalent length.  Each additional foot of ductwork adds to the friction by a defined amount as do each of the elbow fittings.  This friction acts against the airflow and reduces the air velocity.  If your clothes dryer's recommended maximum duct length is unavailable to you, the 2015 International Residential Code defines the safe maximum "total equivalent length" (TEL) as 35 feet.  35 feet of length sounds like plenty, but 35 feet of "equivalent" length can be much less than you expected.  When calculating the TEL of your duct system, add 5' for every standard 90-degree elbow, double the actual length of flexible duct used behind your dryer, and remember to add another 5' if the flexible duct behind the dryer also turns 90 degrees.  Certain types of exterior vents can also be restrictive and contribute to the total effective length.  An example using a dryer duct that turns upward into the attic and exits the side of the house: if you have 2 1/2 feet of flexible duct that turns 90 degrees, then a 10' vertical pipe with another 90 degree elbow on top, you have already used up 20 equivalent feet.  There is only 15' left in your horizontal run to the vent before the allowable 35' TEL is exceeded.  If you do this calculation with the clothes dryer exhaust duct in your home and note that you have exceeded the clothes dryer manufacturer's TEL (or the IRC's recommendation of 35 feet), you have two options.  One option is to relocate your clothes dryer and/or exterior vent such that their locations will require lengths of duct and fittings that fall inside the allowable TEL.  The second option is to add a clothes dryer booster fan to your duct system. 

In new construction, the ideal placement of your clothes dryer and exterior vent are sometimes your primary concern and the resultant TEL of duct required for those locations falls outside of the recommended TEL.  Your only choice is a clothes dryer booster fan.

A clothes dryer booster fan installs inline with your existing or new 4" dryer exhaust duct and will synchronize or interlock its operation with your clothes dryer.   This interlock can be achieved by either a pressure sensor or current sensor.

Why is a current sensor better than a pressure sensor for the dryer interlock?

In order for the booster to operate properly, it must interlock or synchronize its operation with the clothes dryer.  A pressure sensor is one approach to achieve this interlock, but is not the best way in our view.  A pressure sensor integral to the fan imposes restrictions on the mounting orientation of the fan.  Care must be taken to orient the fan such that the intrusion of moisture in the sensing tube is reduced.  Moisture and dust/lint buildup in the pressure sensor body can lead to problems.  The second problem with a pressure sensor interlock is that the booster fan must run on a timed cycle.  The fan must periodically turn off for a time and check the pressure sensor once more for the presence of positive pressure to determine if the clothes dryer is still operating.  Turning the booster off repeatedly in the middle of a dryer cycle potentially increases the risk of lint buildup, and can also be a nuisance if you can hear the fan starting and stopping.  The calibration cycle of some pressure-interlocked booster fans can be a nuisance as well.  Interruptions to the power supply will force the fan to perform its 5 minute calibration cycle every time power is restored.  Since the booster fan's pressure sensing cycle is on a fixed interval, it will often run for several minutes after the clothes dryer cycle has ended.  There is no benefit to this extended run period.  In fact, removing the lint from the clothes dryer's lint trap while the booster fan is continuing to draw air through the screen can be more difficult.

A better approach to interlocking the booster fan's operation with the clothes dryer is to use a current sensor.  The current sensor will detect operation of the clothes dryer's motor and start/stop the booster fan accordingly.  This is a much more reliable synchronization to the clothes dryer's operation that doesn't require cycling or inadvertently extended run-times.  But a standard current sensor switch requires a hard-wired connection to the booster fan and involves interfacing with the supply wiring to the clothes dryer's power outlet on the wall.  This line-voltage wiring work can be a barrier to some installers. This wiring work can be intimidating to the average do-it-yourself installer, or it can add unwelcome time to the busy professional installer's job.  Suncourt's DEDPV uses a low-voltage clip-on (non-invasive) current sensor to achieve this interlock with minimal installation effort and time.  The current sensor clips around one of the cord's power leads on the back of the clothes dryer.  The sensor sits nicely inside the clothes dryer's wiring compartment after it is clipped onto the power lead.  Since clothes dryers include a terminal block inside the wiring compartment for a customer-provided power cord, and our current sensor interfaces only with that power cord, the use of our current sensor does not constitute a modification of "factory wiring."  Our current sensor interfaces to our booster fan's indicator panel using a 72" long cord with a standard 1/8" TRS phone plug, commonly used with headphones or computer speakers.  Additional distance can be added between the sensor and indicator panel with an off-the-shelf extension cable if needed.  Standards require that a booster fan start within one minute of the start of clothes dryer operation.  Our fan starts after 3 seconds of continuous clothes dryer current detection.  Standards also require that a booster fan run no longer than 5 minutes after the dryer cycle has ended.  Our fan stops after 10 seconds. 

    

   

What is a DEDPV?

A DEDPV is a dryer exhaust duct power ventilator.  It is a term used by safety standards and the International Residential Code to describe a specific category of clothes dryer booster fans.  Clothes dryer booster fans solve a particular problem.  But they may introduce new problems to the duct system if they do not function as intended.  In recognizing the implications of these potential problems, UL developed specific standards for clothes dryer booster fans.  These standards include specific construction requirements, performance standards, and additional safety features.  These standards were appended to the UL Standard 705 in a section devoted specifically to DEDPV's.  CSA22.2 113 also adopted similar standards for DEDPV's.  All manufacturers of DEDPV's carrying a mark of safety conformance must meet one or both of these standards if their product is marked as a DEDPV.  These standards ensure that all clothes dryer booster fans produced to the DEDPV standard will perform as intended and will include specific design features that properly mitigate the risks of potential malfunction. 

 

Why is a DEDPV necessary?

 Certified DEDPV's were required for all new residential construction in the 2015 International Residential Code.  While many individual jurisdictions across the US are still on an older IRC standard, adoption of the 2015 IRC is gaining ground and it is expected that the 2015 IRC will be the prevalent standard everywhere clothes dryer duct boosters are used.  Only certified DEDPV's will be acceptable for use.  Clothes dryer booster fans not marked as DEDPV units will not pass building inspections.  DEDPV's are required for clothes dryer boosting applications due to their additional safety features. 

What are the additional safety features of a DEDPV?

A certified DEDPV has certain safety features that are not included in a standard clothes dryer booster fan:

-The housing of the DEDPV must be metal to maintain the fire-rating of the dryer duct assembly.

-The DEDPV must shut down within 15 seconds if it detects a fire inside the clothes dryer or inlet duct. This is a very important safety feature that a standard clothes dryer booster fan does not have. A certified DEDPV will shut down before it can contribute to the spread of fire.

-The DEDPV must include an indication panel that shows that the fan is properly operating, and also shows when the fan is not operating properly. The DEDPV must warn the end-user of a low airflow condition in the duct system. This condition could exist due to crushed flexible duct, inoperable flap(s) in the vent, duct obstructions, or excessive lint buildup anywhere in the dryer or duct system.  This low-airflow condition could also exist if the DEDPV itself is malfunctioning.  That is an important warning since a non-operable fan in your otherwise problematic dryer duct makes the situation worse.  A certified DEDPV must make this low airflow failure notification to the end-user within 4 minutes.  Our DEDPV notifies this condition instantly.  A certified DEDPV will continue to show a "failure" status indefinitely until the problem is resolved.  The standard will allow the omission of an indicator panel if the DEDPV instead prevents the clothes dryer from operating any time one of these duct failure conditions is present.                                   

 

                                    

 

-The DEDPV must include provisions for periodic cleaning. The end-user must be able to easily inspect and clean the interior of the fan without removing the fan or any ductwork. We include removable metal duct cleanout sleeves in our kit for this purpose.  The band clamps on each sleeve are loosened and both sleeves slide out of the way for inspection/cleaning.  Without removable sleeves, a professional duct cleaner won't be able to pass their cleaning device through the entirety of the dryer duct without first removing the DEDPV. 

 

                

 

-The safety listing agency tests the performance of the DEDPV according to the special section in UL standard 705 and/or CSA22.2 113. The testing is rigorous and includes humidity conditioning tests, verifying proper interlock with the clothes dryer, verifying proper airflow at the maximum length, confirming that the fan can handle the duct temperatures at the minimum length, confirming that the fan is capable of maintaining the required airflow at the maximum length when subjected to significant lint-buildup conditions, verifying prompt shutdown during a clothes dryer fire, and proper notification of a low airflow condition. Their testing also authenticates most of the DEDPV manufacturer's claims about performance. As of this writing, only three ventilation manufacturers in the world have satisfied the safety requirements to carry a DEDPV designation on their product.

-All of these features must be integral to the product in order to carry a DEDPV certification. The 2015 IRC requires a fan certified as a DEDPV. Only a fan with these integral features will be certified as a DEDPV after a safety listing agency has tested and verified these features.  A building inspector will look for this DEDPV designation on the fan during an inspection.

Why is Suncourt's DEDPV rated for 100' of duct?

When a DEDPV is certified by a safety listing agency, a "length" of duct is simulated by using a damper to produce the equivalent static pressure of that length.  The listing agency verifies that your fan still produces 1200FPM of air velocity at the maximum equivalent length claimed.  Our fan produces much more than 1200FPM at this equivalent 100' length, and thusly our maximum advertised length could be higher than 100'.  But we have determined the optimum maximum distance.  A safety listing agency does not test a DEDPV's ability to accurately indicate the low-airflow conditions when installed in various positions within varying duct lengths.  We performed these tests ourselves using actual lengths of duct and fittings rather than simulating the length with a damper.  We found on the outlet side that the accuracy of the low-airflow indication is optimum within 35 feet from the vent.  We also determined that the optimum distance to the clothes dryer is up to 65' in order to reliably shut down within 15 seconds of detecting excessive duct temperature.  So these two distances form the basis of our 100' maximum recommended duct length.

 

Subtracting the friction losses from the elbows and exterior vent and assuming 10' of length is used up in vertical elevation, that leaves between 70' and 80' of allowable equivalent duct length from the clothes dryer to the location of the exterior vent.  This is more than ample for the typical residential application.  Having additional equivalent duct length beyond 100' looks like a good metric on paper, but isn't relevant to the application.  A clothes dryer placed anywhere inside even a 10,000 square foot single-story home would find a vent on the nearest exterior wall less than 50 feet away.

What is Centrasense™ and what are its advantages in a DEDPV?

For a DEDPV to do its job of notifying the end-user of potential low-airflow conditions, the fan needs a way to measure the airflow.  There are many ways of accomplishing this often involving additional internal or external sensors.  Our patented method uses no sensors, but instead directly monitors the impeller motor's electrical characteristics.  These characteristics change in predictable and measurable ways under different airflow conditions.  This correlation of motor electrical characteristics to airflow forms the basis of our Centrasense™ technology. 

Unique advantages available only with our DEDPV employing Centrasense™:

 

  • Instantaneous indication of high inlet static pressure condition (low outlet airflow).
  • Instantaneous indication of low inlet static pressure condition (low inlet airflow).
  • Fan reliably starts after 3 seconds of continuous clothes dryer operation.
  • No periodic on/off cycling during clothes dryer operation.
  • Fan stops 10 seconds after the clothes dryer stops operation.
  • Fan can be installed in any orientation.
  • No calibration cycle required when first powering up the unit.
  • Remote indicator is designed for both surface mounting or electrical box mounting.

Each and every one of our DRM04 DEDPV fans are assembled and carefully calibrated right here at our facility in Durant, IA.  And our method of motor detection, Centrasense™, is protected by a utility patent as is our use of a clip-on non-invasive current sensor for the clothes dryer interlock. 

What’s a Suncourt® Centrax® Dryer Boosting Kit?

Suncourt® Centrax® Dryer Boosting Kits also known as Dryer Vent Boosters and Clothes Dryer Vent Boosters are prepackaged kits that are installed to boost the exhaust from dryers that have long duct runs to the outside. The kit consists of a Centrax® centrifugal fan, current switch, and mounting hardware.

Why would I need a Suncourt® Centrax® Dryer Boosting Kit?

Most clothes dryers are designed to vent exhaust up to15 feet. Elbows in the duct count an additional 5 feet each. Today’s homes, condos, and apartments often have the laundry room much further than that from an outside wall. Some of the symptoms of a dryer exhaust duct run being too long:

  • Your clothes take a very long time to dry.
  • Your dryer keeps running for an excessively long time.
  • You have heavy lint build up in your dryer duct.

 

What happens if I have this problem over time?

 

  • The cost to run your dryer for longer times to dry your clothes is higher because you are using more electricity.
  • Increased wear and tear on your dryer means you will have to replace it much sooner.
  • Lint build up in your duct can become a fire hazard.

 

How does a Suncourt® Centrax® Dryer Boosting Kit Work?

The Centrax® Dryer Vent Booster Fan is installed in the dryer vent duct line not less than six feet from the dryer. The Centrax® Dryer Vent Booster Fan requires 120-volt power. The current switch is installed per instructions to the clothes dryer power and wired to the Dryer Vent Booster Fan. The current switch will turn the fan on when it senses power going to the dryer and turn it off when it no longer senses power going to the dryer. The current switch is a more dependable method of operating a Dryer Vent Booster Fan compared to pressure switches that can clog with lint over time. The current switch is completely out of the air stream and can never clog. The Suncourt® Centrax® Dryer Booster Fan draws 1.0 amps or less (depending on model) making these kits one of the most reliable and energy saving Dryer Boosting Kits on the market.

Features and Benefits of the Suncourt® Centrax® Dryer Boosting Kit

The Centrax® Dryer Booster has several features that make it the fan of choice for Dryer Vent Boosting applications:

  • Quiet and efficient fan-The impeller is properly balanced and paired with the motor.
  • Backward inclined blades- allows the Dryer Booster Fan to generate high pressure to get through longer duct runs and help prevent lint clogging the fan.
  • Effective in high temperatures-140 degrees F/60 degrees C.-works with most electric clothes dryers on the market.
  • Thermal overload for extremely high temperatures-if temperatures get too high it will shut itself down.
  • Automatic reset-when the fan cools down it will automatically reset itself without you searching for a button to push.

 

Plug-In Thermostat

What’s a Suncourt® DuctStat®?

The Suncourt® DuctStat® also known as a Plug In Thermostat, Inline Thermostat, or a Plug In Temperature Sensitive Switch is an economical way to turn a 110 volt device on or off due to temperature rise or fall from a user predetermined set point. The DuctStat® is adjustable between 45 degrees F (7 C) to 110 degrees F (43 C).

What would I use a Suncourt® DuctStat® for?

The DuctStat® has a wide range of applications. A few of them are:

  • Suncourt Inline Fans-Use a DuctStat® to turn an Inline Fan on or off that is installed in the ductwork. This keeps you from having to run potentially long wires back to a fan motor in your furnace and reading its wiring diagram to correctly connect the wires.
  • Lights-The DuctStat® can be used to turn on a light bulb or heat lamp when the temperature falls below your set point in a hot box or other contained space that you want to keep above a certain minimum temperature.
  • Hydroponics- Indoor gardeners use the DuctStat® to turn on fans to help cool hot grow lights.
  • Ventilation-The DuctStat® can activate a wide variety of fans if temperature in a room or space rises above a user-determined maximum.

 

How does the Suncourt® DuctStat® work?

The DuctStat® contains a thermistor, which is a very sensitive temperature-sensing device. When the thermistor detects a change in temperature from your set point the DuctStat® activates. The min/max switch on its face controls the maximum differential between on and off. Max stands for maximum differential of about 7 degrees F. Min stands for minimum differential of about 3 degrees F. Simply plug-in your 110 volt device to the DuctStat’s grounded outlet and begin the setting procedure described in the included instructions. If you want the DuctStat® to turn a device on when the temperature rises above your set point you put it on the heat setting. If you want the DuctStat® to turn a device on when the temperature falls below your set point you will want to put it on its cool setting. The DuctStat® will deactivate when the temperature returns to your predetermined set point. Please see the operating instructions for more detail on setting the DuctStat®.

What will a DuctStat® do for me?

The DuctStat® Line Voltage Thermostat greatly simplifies the installation of the power supply to any of our Inductor® In-Line Duct Booster Fans.

Tell me how it simplifies the installation:

When you install an Inductor®, it often happens to be in a location far from your furnace system. Air has a long run to those areas and loses much of its volume and heat (cool in the summer) along the way.
This also means that the wire you must run has to go a long distance.
Perhaps you have a dry-walled ceiling in your basement, making it difficult if not impossible to run a wire from the Inductor to the furnace for operating power.
No matter what reason, the DuctStat® allows you to control the automatic ON/OFF function of your Inductor locally, both for winter heating and summer cooling.

Where do I install the DuctStat®?

The preferred location of the DuctStat® is just ahead (downstream) from the Inductor fan but not closer than 8 inches. Otherwise, anywhere on a duct where it can sense heated or cooled air.

How do I install the DuctStat®?

The DuctStat® is an electronic temperature sensitive line voltage thermostat, meaning it switches a 110-120 Volt AC outlet on the front panel ON and OFF depending on the user preset temperature.
It mounts on the duct in which your Inductor® is installed with 2 or 4 sheet metal screws. You will make a small ½" hole in the metal duct before installing the DuctStat®. The DuctStat® has a corresponding hole in the back of the housing. This allows a small amount of air to flow through the DuctStat® over the temperature-sensing element, thus sensing if your furnace is running (heated air) or if your air conditioner is running (cooled air).

Can I build a DuctStat® into a wall, i.e. drywall or panel over it?

No. The DuctStat® must remain accessible. You will have to switch the function switch to HEAT for the winter and COOL for the summer. You may also need access for service, cleaning or to replace the front panel fuse.

Can I use it to control other stuff depending on temperature?

Yes. Simply mounted on a wall, the DuctStat® will sense ambient temperature and turn device ON or Off at a user selected temperature.
You may control any device with a 5 Amp maximum load such as: a warning siren or light, electric operated vent louver, the Suncourt ThruWall Fan, solar panel fans, greenhouse louvers or fans, etc.

How many Inductor fans can I control with the DuctStat®?

The maximum load is 5 Amp. Simply add up the Amp rating and do not exceed 5 Amp.

Can I switch loads greater than 5 Amp?

No. However, you can switch a large relay ON and OFF with the DuctStat®. Your maximum load is now determined by the current capacity of that relay.

How do I get 110-120 Volt AC power to the DuctStat®?

The DuctStat® has a 6 foot long power cord with a grounded plug. Simply plug it into the nearest outlet. If you do not have an electric outlet within 6 feet, you will have to install one.

How do I connect the Inductor® to the DuctStat®?

You will have to install a cord and grounded plug assembly on the Inductor. That plug will simply plug into the outlet on the front of the DuctStat®.

What is the temperature adjustment range of the DuctStat®?

The user selectable temperature range (ON/OFF switching range) of the DuctStat® is approximately 40°F (4°C) to 110°F (43°C).

How sensitive is the DuctStat®?

The electronic circuitry is very sensitive. The sensing element will react to changing temperatures in a few seconds. The differential between ON and OFF can be selected by the user to be 3°F and 7°F with a Min-Max switch on the control panel.
The higher 7°F differential setting is provided to reduce possible ON/OFF cycling of the thermostat when temperature increases or decreases are not smooth.

How safe is the DuctStat®?

The DuctStat® has been rigorously tested to the standards of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL®). The housing is made of a high strength ABS - Polycarbonate, flame retardant alloy. The electronics and panel outlet are fused by a replaceable 5 Amp panel fuse. Internally, the unit has two additional levels of fuse protection.
Both the power cord and panel outlet are 3-prong grounded.

How much power does the DuctStat® use?

The standby power consumption of the DuctStat® is minimal. Less than 2 Watts.

Radon Mitigation Kits

Register Booster Fans

What will the Equalizer® EQ2 do for me?

The Equalizer® EQ2 is designed to be placed over a floor or wall register (6" x 12" maximum size) to boost the airflow from that register. By boosting airflow, it will warm up rooms that are chronically cold in the winter and cool down rooms that are chronically too hot in the summer.

Does the Equalizer® EQ2 heat or cool the air?

No. The Equalizer® EQ2 does neither heat nor cool the air. It boosts airflow from a register, thus bringing more heated air from your furnace or cooled air from your air conditioner into a problem room.

When I hold my hand above the Equalizer® EQ2, I do not feel much air.

The Equalizer® EQ2 has a patented fan system that disperses the air in a more or less horizontal circular pattern. To blow air from the unit straight up to the ceiling is not desirable. Hold your hands to the sides of the air exhaust grille of the Equalizer® EQ2 and you will feel the airflow. This way, the air stays at the lower room level; not the ceiling.

The air coming from the Equalizer® EQ2 feels cold during the winter heating season.

Moving air flowing over your skin feels colder than still air. The temperature of the air is in fact the same. That "cold" sensation on your skin comes from the evaporation of the moisture on your skin caused by moving air. That is why sitting in the airflow of a fan feels good on a hot summer day. The air from that fan has the same temperature as the other surrounding air. Again, the air movement over your skin causes the chilly sensation. That is why drafts are so uncomfortable.

How do I connect the Equalizer® EQ2 to the power?

No installation is required for the Equalizer® EQ2. You simply place it over a floor register (6" x 12" maximum size) and plug it into the nearest 110 Volt wall outlet.

How much electricity does an Equalizer® EQ2 use?

The Equalizer® EQ2 uses 27 Watts when running. Like a small light bulb.

Can I mount the Equalizer® EQ2 on a wall register?

Yes, small keyhole slots are provided in the bottom grille of the Equalizer® EQ2. Depending on the size and type of wall register, you may install screws in the register or surrounding wall and simply hang the Equalizer® EQ2 on those screws. In some instances, it is not possible to install screws for hanging the Equalizer® EQ2 with the function panel label on the top. In this case you will need to hang it upside down. Note that the lettering on the function label will be upside down also.

Does the Equalizer® EQ2 have to cover a register entirely?

Yes. The Equalizer® EQ2 must cover a register grille opening entirely. The Equalizer® EQ2 is designed to create a slight vacuum at the register, thus pull air from the duct. You do not want to pull in room air.

How do I turn the Equalizer® OFF and ON?

Your Equalizer® EQ2 is equipped with a highly sensitive electronic thermostat. This thermostat will automatically turn the fan ON when it senses heated air after the furnace starts. Similarly, it will turn the fan ON when your air conditioner starts. This operation is fully automatic and you have a control on the function panel to fine tune when you wish the Equalizer® EQ2 to start and stop.

Can I run my Equalizer® EQ2 continuously?

Yes. On the function control panel you will find a switch setting "HEAT" for automatic operation with your furnace in the winter and "COOL" for automatic operation in the summertime with your air conditioner. The "ON" setting provides continuous operation.

Why do the instructions say, "unplug when not in use?"

We recommend that you unplug the Equalizer® EQ2 between seasons when neither the furnace nor air conditioner is operating, during vacations when you are away from home, etc. This will save wear and tear and unnecessary energy use.

Can I mount the Equalizer® EQ2 over a ceiling register?

Suncourt recommends against mounting an Equalizer® EQ2 over a ceiling register for safety concerns in the event the unit would fall down if not properly attached. Also, since the airflow is exhausted in a circular pattern, the boosted warm air will remain at the ceiling.

Can I use the Equalizer® EQ2 upside down?

The Equalizer® EQ2 will operate in any position.

Can I use the Equalizer® EQ2 to vent outside air?

No. The Equalizer® EQ2 is not approved to vent outside air (such as in a window) where the unit may become wet from rain or excessive moisture.

Is the Equalizer® EQ2 safe?

The Equalizer® EQ2 has been rigorously tested to the Standards of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL®) for your safety. The housing is made of a high impact flame retardant ABS material and the electric motor is Thermally Protected. The fan impeller is made out of Polycarbonate material, the material used for jet fighter canopies.

How do I clean my Equalizer® EQ2?

Generally, maintaining a clean household and regularly replacing the central air system filter will avoid build-up of dirt and dust in the Equalizer® EQ2. The Equalizer® EQ2 cannot be opened for cleaning. Doing so would void the warranty and poses a risk of injury. Normally, accumulated dust can be blown out of the unit and dirt can be removed using a small brush or cotton swabs.

What will the Flush Fit Register Booster do for me?

The Flush Fit Register Booster is designed to be placed in your existing register. It will replace a standard 4" x 10" register grill and boost the airflow from that register. By boosting airflow, it will warm up rooms that are chronically cold in the winter and cool down rooms that are chronically too hot in the summer.

Does the Flush Fit Register Booster heat or cool the air?

No. The Flush Fit Register Booster neither heats nor cools the air. It boosts airflow from a register, thus bringing more heated air from your furnace or cooled air from your air conditioner into a problem room.

The air coming from the Flush Fit Register Booster feels cold during the winter heating season.

Moving air flowing over your skin feels colder than still air. The temperature of the air is in fact the same. That "cold" sensation on your skin comes from the evaporation of the moisture on your skin caused by moving air. That is why sitting in the airflow of a fan feels good on a hot summer day. The air from that fan has the same temperature as the other surrounding air. Again, the air movement over your skin causes the chilly sensation. That is why drafts are so uncomfortable.

How do I connect the Flush Fit Register Booster to the power?

No installation is required for the Flush Fit Register Booster. You simply place it in the  floor register (4" x 10" maximum size) plug the small end of the transformer in the outlet on the face of the Flush Fit Register Booster then plug the wall transformer into the nearest 110 Volt wall outlet.

How much electricity does an Flush Fit Register Booster use?

The Flush Fit Register booster uses very little electricity. With the fans on high the booster uses about 15 watts of electricity.

Can I mount the Flush Fit Register Booster on a wall register?

Yes, small screw bosses are molded into the back of the Flush Fit Register Booster.

 

 

 Drill out the bosses with a 3/16" drill bit and secure the HC500 to the wall. Directions are also provided on our instruction page.

How do I turn the Flush Fit Register Booster OFF and ON?

The Mode button will cycle through the four settings for the Flush Fit Register Booster. When the mode button is pressed and the "ON" light is lit the automatic thermostat function is bypassed and the fans will remain on. If you want to circulate a small amount of air this is the mode to use. Your Flush Fit Register Booster is equipped with a highly sensitive electronic thermostat. When the Mode is in the "HEAT" or "COOL" setting the thermostat will control the on/off of the fans. In the "HEAT" Mode the thermostat will automatically turn the fans on when it senses heated air after the furnace starts. Similarly, when in the "COOL" Mode it will turn the fans on when it senses cooled air after  your air conditioner starts. This operation is fully automatic and you have a control on the function panel to fine tune when you wish the Flush Fit Register Booster to start and stop.

Can I run my Flush Fit Register Booster continuously?

Yes. When the mode button is pressed and the "ON" light is lit the automatic thermostat function is bypassed and the fans will remain on.

Why do the instructions say, "unplug when not in use?"

We recommend that you unplug the Flush Fit Register Booster between seasons when neither the furnace nor air conditioner is operating, during vacations when you are away from home, etc. This will save wear and tear and unnecessary energy use.

Can I mount the Flush Fit Register Booster over a ceiling register?

Suncourt recommends against mounting an Flush Fit Register Booster over a ceiling register for safety concerns in the event the unit would fall down if not properly attached.

Can I use the Flush Fit Register Booster upside down?

The Flush Fit Register Booster will operate in any position.

Can I use the Flush Fit Register Booster to vent outside air?

No. The Flush Fit Register Booster is not approved to vent outside air (such as in a window) where the unit may become wet from rain or excessive moisture.

Is the Flush Fit Register Booster safe?

The Flush Fit Register Booster has been rigorously tested to the Standards of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL®) for your safety. The housing is made of a high impact flame retardant ABS.

How do I clean my Flush Fit Register Booster?

Generally, maintaining a clean household and regularly replacing the central air system filter will avoid build-up of dirt and dust in the Flush Fit Register Booster. The Flush Fit Register Booster cannot be opened for cleaning. Doing so would void the warranty and poses a risk of injury. Normally, accumulated dust can be blown out of the unit and dirt can be removed using a small brush or cotton swabs.

 

Room To Room Fans

What’s a Suncourt® ThruWall Fan™?

Suncourt manufactures two ThruWall™ Fans also known as Room to Room Fans, Through the Wall Fans, and Transfer Fans. These quiet ThruWall™ Fans are mounted through the wall to transfer air from one room to another.

What would I use a Through the Wall Fan for?

You can use a Through the Wall Fan to equalize temperature between rooms in a variety of applications.

  • Wood Stove, pellet stove, fireplace, or other alternative heat source owners use a Room to Room Fan to extend the effective range of their heat source to other rooms.
  • Window air conditioner owners can likewise transfer that cool air to another room for increased efficiency with a Room to Room Fan.
  • Homes with a new three-season room or an attached greenhouse benefit from installing a Room to Room Fan to transfer air into or out of the greenhouse or room.
  • Mini-split users install a Room to Room Fan to increase airflow to a back bedroom or office that just doesn’t quite get enough air to stay warm in the winter and cool in the summer.
  • Commercial users install Room to Room Fans as an accessory to PTAC (Packaged Terminal Air Conditioner) units to transfer heated or cooled air in hotel suites, assisted living or other apartments, dorms, etc. They are more efficient than using duct extender kits and much more cost effective. They also provide a much cleaner look than clunky ductwork.

 

Which Suncourt® ThruWall™ Fan model is right for me?

 

  • The Suncourt® Model TW208P ThruWall™ Fan is hard wired in the wall and features a variable speed control that will adjust the fan from low to high. It has a telescoping housing that allows it to be installed in walls 3 ¾” to 6 ½” thick. The grille can be manually rotated to direct airflow for maximum comfort. The TW208P ThruWall™ fan is ETL approved for use in both the United States and Canada.
  • The Suncourt® Model TW108 ThruWall™ Fan features a 10’ grounded power cord and a 3-position rocker switch, which allows you to run the fan on low and/or high.It also has a telescoping housing that allows it to be installed in walls 3 ¾” to 6 ½” thick. The TW108 ThruWall™ fan is ETL approved for use in both the United States and Canada.

 

What is the difference between the two ThruWall™ fans?

Suncourt now has two ThruWall™ fans available, the ThruWall™ (model number TW108) and the ThruWall™ Pro (model number TW208P.)

  • The ThruWall™ has a 10 foot grounded plug while the ThruWall™ Pro needs to be hardwired into the homes electricity.
  • The ThruWall™ has a 2-speed motor while the ThruWall™ Pro has a variable speed motor.
  • The ThruWall™ has a fixed output grille while the ThruWall™ Pro has a rotating grille that allows airflow direction to be changed.

 

What will a ThruWall™ fan do for me?

The ThruWall™ fan is designed to move significant volumes of air from one space in a building to the next.

Why would I want to move air from one space to another?

You may want to move heat from a central heating source to an adjacent space. Similarly, you may want to move cooled air from a window air conditioner to an adjacent space.
In other applications:

  • Move heated or cooled air from one room to another if there is a great difference in temperatures between the two rooms. i.e. one room is nice and warm in the winter. The room next to it, located over an unheated space is always cold. Simply blow air from the warm to the cold room.
  • Vent a room that always seems stuffy.
  • Move air in or out of an All Season room.
  • Vent a TV or family room with a smoker.
  • Balance temperature between rooms in a hotel suite or small apartment that is heated and cooled by a PTAC.

 

Can I reverse the direction that the air flows?

No. You will determine the direction of the airflow when installing the ThruWall™.

How much electricity does a ThruWall™ use?

The ThruWall™ uses 85 Watts while the ThruWall™ Pro uses 55 Watts. Similar to a medium sized light bulb.

How do I control fan speed?

The ThruWall™ has a High - Low speed rocker switch with Center Off position. The ThruWall™ Pro has a variable speed dial.

How quiet is the ThruWall™?

Very quiet. The sound levels are 55dBA on high speed and 49dBA at low speed. This sound level compares to the sound of a desktop computer fan. Visit the NOISE page in this FAQ section.

How do I get power to the ThruWall™?

The ThruWall™ has a 10 foot long power cord with grounded plug. The ThruWall™ Pro will need to be hard-wired into the homes electricity.

In what wall thickness can I install a ThruWall™?

The ThruWall™ installs in any wall 4" to 6.5" thick. The two halves of the fan unit telescope to accommodate different wall thickness.

Is a ThruWall™ safe?

Yes. Both ThruWall™ fans have been rigorously tested to the Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL®) standards. The through the wall portion of the housing is made of galvanized sheet metal, the grilles are high impact flame retardant ABS. The electric motor is a Class B, Thermally Protected motor.

What’s a Suncourt® ThruWall™ Fan?

Suncourt manufactures two ThruWall™ Fans also known as Room to Room Fans, Through the Wall Fans, and Transfer Fans. These quiet ThruWall Fans are mounted through the wall to transfer air from one room to another.

What would I use a Through the Wall Fan for?

You can use a Through the Wall Fan to equalize temperature between rooms in a variety of applications.

  • Wood Stove, pellet stove, fireplace, or other alternative heat source owners use a Room to Room Fan to extend the effective range of their heat source to other rooms.
  • Window air conditioner owners can likewise transfer that cool air to another room for increased efficiency with a Room to Room Fan.
  • Homes with a new three-season room or an attached greenhouse benefit from installing a Room to Room Fan to transfer air into or out of the greenhouse or room.
  • Mini-split users install a Room to Room Fan to increase airflow to a back bedroom or office that just doesn’t quite get enough air to stay warm in the winter and cool in the summer.
  • Commercial users install Room to Room Fans as an accessory to PTAC (Packaged Terminal Air Conditioner) units to transfer heated or cooled air in hotel suites, assisted living or other apartments, dorms, etc. They are more efficient than using duct extender kits and much more cost effective. They also provide a much cleaner look than clunky ductwork.

 

Which Suncourt® ThruWall™ Fan model is right for me?

 

  • The Suncourt® Model TW208P ThruWall™ Fan is hard wired in the wall and features a variable speed control that will adjust the fan from low to high. It has a telescoping housing that allows it to be installed in walls 3 ¾” to 6 ½” thick. The grille can be manually rotated to direct airflow for maximum comfort. The TW208P ThruWall™ fan is ETL approved for use in both the United States and Canada.
  • The Suncourt® Model TW108 ThruWall™ Fan features a 10’ grounded power cord and a 3-position rocker switch, which allows you to run the fan on low and/or high.It also has a telescoping housing that allows it to be installed in walls 3 ¾” to 6 ½” thick. The TW108 ThruWall™ fan is ETL approved for use in both the United States and Canada.

 

What is the difference between the two ThruWall™ fans?

Suncourt now has two ThruWall™ fans available, the ThruWall™ (model number TW108) and the ThruWall™ Pro (model number TW208P.)

  • The ThruWall™ has a 10 foot grounded plug while the ThruWall™ Pro needs to be hardwired into the homes electricity.
  • The ThruWall™ has a 2-speed motor while the ThruWall™ Pro has a variable speed motor.
  • The ThruWall™ has a fixed output grille while the ThruWall™ Pro has a rotating grille that allows airflow direction to be changed.

 

What will a ThruWall™ fan do for me?

The ThruWall™ fan is designed to move significant volumes of air from one space in a building to the next.

Why would I want to move air from one space to another?

You may want to move heat from a central heating source to an adjacent space. Similarly, you may want to move cooled air from a window air conditioner to an adjacent space.
In other applications:

  • Move heated or cooled air from one room to another if there is a great difference in temperatures between the two rooms. i.e. one room is nice and warm in the winter. The room next to it, located over an unheated space is always cold. Simply blow air from the warm to the cold room.
  • Vent a room that always seems stuffy.
  • Move air in or out of an All Season room.
  • Vent a TV or family room with a smoker.
  • Balance temperature between rooms in a hotel suite or small apartment that is heated and cooled by a PTAC.

 

Can I reverse the direction that the air flows?

No. You will determine the direction of the airflow when installing the ThruWall™.

How much electricity does a ThruWall™ use?

The ThruWall™ uses 85 Watts while the ThruWall™ Pro uses 55 Watts. Similar to a medium sized light bulb.

How do I control fan speed?

The ThruWall™ has a High - Low speed rocker switch with Center Off position. The ThruWall™ Pro has a variable speed dial.

How quiet is the ThruWall™?

Very quiet. The sound levels are 55dBA on high speed and 49dBA at low speed. This sound level compares to the sound of a desktop computer fan. Visit the NOISE page in this FAQ section.

How do I get power to the ThruWall™?

The ThruWall™ has a 10 foot long power cord with grounded plug. The ThruWall™ Pro will need to be hard-wired into the homes electricity.

In what wall thickness can I install a ThruWall™?

The ThruWall™ installs in any wall 4" to 6.5" thick. The two halves of the fan unit telescope to accommodate different wall thickness.

Is a ThruWall™ safe?

Yes. Both ThruWall™ fans have been rigorously tested to the Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL®) standards. The through the wall portion of the housing is made of galvanized sheet metal, the grilles are high impact flame retardant ABS. The electric motor is a Class B, Thermally Protected motor.

Sound Mufflers

What’s a Suncourt® DuctMuffler?

The Suncourt® DuctMuffler also sometimes known as a Duct Silencer is a passive device that is installed in ductwork to help attenuate (that means reduce) the level of noise that is transmitted through the duct.

What would I use a DuctMuffler for?

You would use a Suncourt® DuctMuffler for loud, annoying sounds traveling through your ductwork from such sources as noisy air handlers, fans, a loud furnace or air conditioner, voices or music from other rooms. There are many applications but here are just a few:

  • Home Theater Noise Reduction-Quiet the sound of the furnace or other noises in the home to make the acoustics you spent so much money on sound just right. A DuctMuffler will also keep noise from a Home Theater Room from spreading to the rest of the house.
  • Conference Room Noise Reduction-Help from spreading to every office cubicle near a register the things you would prefer to keep quiet in your conference room.
  • Lecture Hall Noise Reduction-Attendees can concentrate on the speaker instead of the noises the ventilation system is making.
  • Music Studio Noise Reduction-Duct Silencers are a tremendous help when recording, especially if multiple studios have different things going on all at the same time.
  • Household Noise Reduction-You can sleep better when you don’t have to listen to fans, furnaces, air conditioners, or noise from other parts of the house.

 

How does a Suncourt® DuctMuffler work?

The Suncourt® DuctMuffler is a completely passive device that will not impede airflow when it is attached to the ductwork. It is made of metal and is lined with an acoustic insulation that reduces sound. The insulation is covered with a wire mesh to keep the insulation in place.

Why do I need a DuctMuffler?

The DuctMuffler will reduce sound traveling through ducts, i.e. loud music from adjacent rooms, snoring, speech and noise generated by the furnace blower.

How do I install a DuctMuffler?

Simply remove a section of air duct from the offending duct run and insert a DuctMuffler. The DuctMuffler is a heavy product and must be properly supported using duct support brackets available at your favorite Home Center.

How effective is a DuctMuffler?

Please note that every 3 dBA in noise level reduction may cut your perception of noise by half. Visit the noise page in this FAQ section.

Does the DuctMuffler affect airflow through my ducts?

No. The open bore of the muffler is the same as the duct in which it is installed. There are no baffles or barriers.

Does it require any maintenance?

No. No maintenance is required.

Does it require electricity?

No, the DuctMuffler is a passive device.